Timeline Hittites

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Apaliunas was a Hittite god.
 (AM, 7/01, p.65)

4,000BC    The Hittites settled around Cappadocia in present day Turkey.
    (Smith., 5/95, p.25)

2,000BC    The Hittites lived around what is now Cappadocia, Turkey. They mixed with the already-settled Hatti and were followed by the Lydians, Phrygians, Byzantines, Romans and Greeks.
    (SFEC, 9/14/97, p.T14)

1700BC-1250BC    Troy VI, the bronze age settlement of the site of the Trojan War. The inhabitants probably spoke Luvian, an Indo-European language related to Hittite.
    (Nat. Hist., 4/96, p.49-50)

1595BC        The Hittites captured Babylon and retreated. They left the city open to Kassite domination which lasted about 300 years. They maintained the Sumerian/Babylonian culture without innovations of their own.
    (eawc, p.4)

1450BC-1300BC    The Hittite culture reached its highpoint and dominated the territory North and East of Babylon including Turkey and northern Palestine. By this time the Hittites have constructed a mythology with a state pantheon.
    (eawc, p.4)

1350BC    The 1st recorded smallpox epidemic took place during an Egyptian-Hittite war. Hittite warriors caught the disease from Egyptian prisoners. The king and heir were fatally infected and the empire fell apart.
    (SFC, 10/19/01, p.A17)(NW, 10/14/02, p.46)

1347BC-1338BC    Tutankhamun, Pharaoh of Egypt, ruled for nine years. He was followed by King Ay, and then a soldier named Horemhab, whom some regard as the last Pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty  while others think he was the founder of the Nineteenth. Horemhab is thought to have prevented the dynastic marriage of Ankhesnamun [Ankhesenamen], the widow of Tutankhamun, to prince Zananza, son of the Hittite king, Suppilliliumas. Documents discovered at the Hittite capital of Boghaz-Koy in Turkey prove beyond doubt that the young queen was writing to Suppililiumas imploring him to send her one of his sons so that she might make him King of Egypt. It is suspected that the young prince was killed on his was to Egypt under the orders of Ay or Horemhab. Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamen.
    (L.C.-W.P.p.107-110)(NG, May 1985, R. Caputo, p.598)(SFC, 8/5/96, p.A10)

1295BC-1272BC    The Hittite king Muwatalli II signed a treaty with Alaksandu, ruler of the Arzawa land known as Wilusa, which became Wilios in Bronze Age Greece and then slurred to Ilios for Homer’s Iliad.
    (Arch, 5/04, p.40)

1286BC    The Hittites fought off the invading Egyptians. This reflected the power gained from trading metals abundant in Turkey.
    (eawc, p.5)

1285BC    Battle of Kadesh, in the fifth year of his reign Ramesses moved to meet and destroy the forces of the Hittite king, Muwatallis, grandson of Suppililiumas. Here some 70,000-100,000 armed men clashed in fury... The battle lasted two days... and was decisive in that the Hittite advanced no further.
    (L.C.-W.P.p.116-119)

1275BC    Pharaoh Ramses II took back the coastal kingdoms of Canaan, Phoenicia and Amarru from their Hittite overlords.
    (ON, 12/11, p.1)

1274BC     Pharaoh Ramses II, in the fifth year of his reign, moved to meet and destroy the forces of the Hittite king, Muwatalli II, grandson of Suppililiumas.  Ramses left his mark on a cliff face by the Nahr al Kalb (Dog River) when he marched north from Egypt to battle the Hittites. In the Battle of Kadesh some 70,000-100,000 armed men clashed in fury... The battle lasted two days... and was decisive in that the Hittite advanced no further. The Hittites fought off the invading Egyptians. This reflected the power gained from trading metals abundant in Turkey.
    (L.C.-W.P.p.116-119)(NG, Aug., 1974, p.157)(ON, 12/11, p.1)

1272BC    Hittite King Muwatalli II died. Ramses II launched his 3rd invasion into the Levant, but was unable to reassert permanent control.
    (ON, 12/11, p.2)

1267BC    Hattusili became king of the Hittites after he deposed his nephew Mursili, the son of King Muwatalli. Mursili fled to Egypt and sought asylum from Ramses II.
    (ON, 12/11, p.2)

1267k BC - 1237k BC    King Hattusili III ruled the Hittites during this period. He wrote a letter to the king of Ahhiyawa (thought to be Mycenaean Greeks) and mentioned that Wilusa was once a bone of contention.
    (Arch, 5/04, p.40)

1261BC    Egyptian and Hittite diplomats concluded the Treaty of Kadesh, the world’s first known int’l. peace accord.
    (ON, 12/11, p.2)

1248BC    Pharaoh Ramses II, about this time, took one of Hittite King Hattusili’s daughters as one of his many wives.
    (ON, 12/11, p.2)

1200BC    The Hittite Empire fell when invading Assyrians sacked and burned their capital, Hattussa (Hattusha).
    (ON, 12/11, p.2)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattusa)

1192BC    Ramessu III beat back a more formidable attack. The inscription describing this war was engraved on the second pylon of the temple of Medinet Habu. The inscription describes how the northerners were disturbed, and proceeded to move eastward and southward, swamping in turn the land of the Hittites, Carchemish, Arvad, Cyprus, Syria, and other places of the same region. The Hittites and North Syrians had been so crippled by them that Ramessu took the opportunity to extend the frontier of Egyptian territory northward... the twofold ravaging of Syria left it weakened and opened the door for the colonization of its coast-lands by the beaten remnant of the invading army.
    (R.M.-P.H.C.p.23)

1185BC    The Hittite empire fell to the “Sea People," an invading group coming from the west whose precise identity is unknown.
    (eawc, p.5)

900-840BC    The Assyrians expanded their empire to the west. By 840 they conquered Syria and Turkey, territory that had formerly belonged to the Hittites.
    (eawc, p.6)

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