Timeline Slovenia

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  Ljubljana originated as a Roman settlement called Emona.
 (SSFC, 8/18/02, p.C6)
  Slovenia's area in 2004 was 20,000 square km. (7,700 sq. miles).
  (Econ, 1/31/04, p.52)

43,000BC    A flutelike instrument made of bear bone was found by archeologist Janez Dirjec at the Divje Babe site in the valley of the Idrijca River in Slovenia. It was believed to be about 45,000 years old.
    (SFC, 10/31/96, p.A12)

745AD        Some 200,000 Slovenians, settled in a pocket of the eastern slopes of the Alps, were threatened by the Avars and the Bavarians. For safety they adopted Christianity and accepted the protection of the Frankish emperor
    (SFC, 5/26/96, T-5)

c1300-1400    In the early 14th century the Gottscheers settled in the Carniola region of what later became Slovenia. The Germanic people were sent there to till the land and pay taxes to the Carinthian counts of Ortenburg and to serve as a forward guard for the Holy Roman Empire.
    (SFC, 6/16/99, p.A12)

c1500-1600    The Predjama Castle was built at the mouth of a huge cave at Postojna, Slovenia. It was later used by the highway robber Erasmus Luegger.
    (SSFC, 8/18/02, p.C7)

1580        In Slovenia 6 stallions were brought from Spain to the stable at Lipica (Lipizza) by a Hapsburg duke. The breed mixed with the Karst horse, native to the region since Roman times, and with others horses to forge the Lipizzaners.
    (WSJ, 12/22/98, p.A16)

1800        France Presern (d.1849), author, painter, poet, musician, mathematician and architect, was born in Slovenia. His image was later featured on Slovenia’s 1,000-tolar bills.
    (SSFC, 8/18/02, p.C6)

1809        Jul 5-1809 Jul 6, Napoleon beat Austria’s archduke Charles at the Battle of Wagram. He annexed the Illyrian Provinces (now part of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Montenegro), and abolished the Papal States.
    (http://tinyurl.com/vx8dk)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Wagram)

1901        In Ljubljana, Slovenia, the Dragon Bridge was built on the site of the former wooden “Butcher’s Bridge."
    (SSFC, 5/23/04, p.D9)

1915        May 23, Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary. Italy entered World War I and came up against the Austro-Hungarian forces including many Slovenians in the Julian Alps near Trieste. Over 29 months 12 major battles were fought along the Soca River.
    (AP, 5/23/97)(HN, 5/23/98)(SFEC, 7/9/00, p.T14)

1915-1917    As many as 1 million lives were lost along the Isonza Front in northern Slovenia.
    (SFEC, 7/9/00, p.T14)

1917        Jul 20, The Pact of Corfu was signed between the Serbs, Croats & Slovenes to form Yugoslavia. [see Dec 1, 1918]
    (www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1917yugoslavia1.html)

1917        Oct 24, The Austro-German army routed the Italian army at Caporetto, Italy. In what came to be known as the 1st blitzkrieg German and Austro-Hungarian forces took at least 250,000 Italian soldiers as prisoners on the Isonzo Front.
    (HN, 10/24/98)(SFEC, 7/9/00, p.T14)

1918        Oct 29-1918 Oct 31, The Kingdom of Greater Serbia was proclaimed at Sarajevo in Bosnia bringing that state into what was later called Yugoslavia. [see Dec 1]
    (BWH, 1988)
 
1918         Nov 7, The Yugoslav National Conference at Geneva decided on the union of Croatia and Slovenia with Serbia and Montenegro. [see Dec 1]
    (BWH, 1988)

1918        Nov 24, Another proclamation took place of the United Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. [see Dec 1]
    (BWH, 1988)
 
1918        Nov 26, Montenegro deposed its king who opposed union and voted to join the new Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. [see Dec 1]
    (BWH, 1988)

1918        Dec 1, The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes [later in 1929 to be called Yugoslavia] was proclaimed by Alexander Karadjordjevic, the son of King Peter of Serbia. It included the previously independent kingdoms of Serbia and Macedonia, the Hungarian-controlled regions of Croatia and Slovenia, the Austrian province of Dalmatia, Carniola and parts of Styria, Carinthia and Istria. King Alexander I renamed the Balkan state called the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes to Yugoslavia in 1929.
    (AP, 10/3/97)(HNQ, 3/26/99)(http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/static/map/yugoslavia/1900/)

1920         Jun 4, The Treaty of Trianon, signed at Versailles, was forced upon Hungary by the victorious Allies after WWII and resulted in Hungary giving up nearly three-fourths of its territory to Romania, Czechoslovakia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croat and Slovenes. Hungary lost more than half its population, including some 3 million Hungarians. Hungary ceded the hills of Transylvania to Romania.
    (HNQ, 7/5/98)(WSJ, 1/2/97, p.1)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Trianon)

1920        Oct 10, The Carinthian Plebiscite  determined the border between Austria and the newly formed Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carinthian_Plebiscite)

1929        Oct 3, The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes formally changed its name to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. King Alexander I renamed the Balkan state called the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, Yugoslavia. The Kingdom had been formed on December 1, 1918 and was ruled by the Serbian Karageorgevic dynasty. It included the previously independent kingdoms of Serbia and Macedonia, the Hungarian-controlled regions of Croatia and Slovenia, the Austrian province of Dalmatia, Carniola and parts of Styria, Carinthia and Istria.
    (AP, 10/3/97)(HN, 10/3/98)(HNQ, 3/26/99)

1929        Joze Plecnik, architect, added two foot bridges (Tromostovje) at the heart of the Slovenia’s capital, Ljubljana. He designed the city for pedestrians and put in colonnades, market places and loggias insisting that everyday enterprises deserved monumental surroundings.
    (SFC, 5/26/96, T-5,7)(SSFC, 8/18/02, p.C7)

1941-1942    Some 97% of the Gottscheers were moved north within Slovenia from the area of Kocevje to Rann (later Brezice). Their peak population numbered some 25,000. They were driven out of their new homes by Yugoslav partisans after which they wound up in Austria and then dispersed around the world.
    (SFC, 6/16/99, p.A12)

1943        In Slovenia Lojze Grozde (20), a high school student, was captured as the country was occupied by Italy and Germany. Communist-run antifascist rebels, known as partisans, reportedly found a Latin prayer book in his possession and suspected him of collaborating with Italian fascists. His mutilated body was found a month later in a forest. In 2010 Grozde was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI.
    (AP, 6/13/10)

1945        May-1945 Jun, The graves of some 1,000 Croatian soldiers killed at this time were found in 1999 near Maribor in eastern Slovenia. Another 6-7,000 bodies were believed to be buried in the area. Slovenia, which during the war was occupied by Italy and Germany, became a killing field, as thousands in the newly formed Yugoslavia, including Germans, Italians, Hungarians, Croatians, and Serbs, tried to escape to Austria. The Slovene government began listing "concealed graves" in 2003. By 2010 officials had a list of about 600 suspected graves, at least one in each community, amounting to perhaps 100,000 bodies.
    (SFC, 6/17/99, p.C3)(AP, 11/15/10)

1945        Some 40,000 anti-Soviet Cossacks, who had surrendered to the British in Austria, were turned over to the Red Army. Some 30,000 Yugoslavs were handed over to Tito under the pretense that they were being sent to Italy. The Yugoslavs were locked into trains and taken to Slovenia, where they were shot and buried in mass graves.
    (WSJ, 3/17/98, p.A16)

1957        Joze Plecnik, Ljubljana architect, died at age 85. His work included the promenade of Tivoli Park, the colonnade of the central market, a reworking of the Triple Bridge and numerous other buildings.
    (SFEC, 7/9/00, p.T14)

1989        Feb, The Slovenes formed an opposition party to Communist rule.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)

1989-1990    Janez Drnovsek served as the Communist president.
    (SFC, 11/11/96, p.A11)

1990        Apr, A pro-independence coalition won in Slovenia.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)

1990        Dec 23, Slovenians voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence and their republic’s secession from Yugoslavia.
    (AP, 12/23/00)(www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/3407.htm)

1991        Jun 24, Croatia and Slovenia voted to declare independence unless some new agreement was reached among the Yugoslav republics.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)

1991        Jun 25, Slovenia proclaimed independence from Yugoslavia.
    (www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/3407.htm)
1991        Jun 25, The civil war in Yugoslavia began when Croatia and Slovenia proclaimed independence from Yugoslavia. Following months of unsuccessful talks among Yugoslavia’s six republics about the future of the federation, the western republics of Croatia and Slovenia declared their independence. Entities of Yugoslavia began to split off leaving Serbia and Montenegro.
    (HFA, '96, p.32)(SFC, 10/18/96, A16)(SFC,10/16/97, p.A12)(AP, 6/25/01)

1991        Jun 26, Slovenian crowds gathered to declare their independence. They blockaded the barracks of the Yugoslav army and their Territorial Defense Force attacked border crossings and armored columns.
    (SFC, 5/26/96, T-5)

1991        Jun 27, Yugoslav army tanks and helicopters attacked Slovenia. Fighting broke out between Serbian and Croatian militias. The Slovene militia trapped an armored column and captured 2,000 soldiers. The prisoners were released and an agreement was reached for Slovenia to control its own borders after a 90 day period of int’l. observation.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)(SFC,10/16/97, p.A12)

1991        Jul 2, A European Community-brokered truce between Yugoslavia and the breakaway republic of Slovenia was shattered as the federal army battled Slovene militias.
    (AP, 7/2/01)

1991        Aug 5, The Yugoslav army called off its intervention to Slovenia’s independence.
    (SFC, 5/26/96, T-5)

1991        Oct 8, Slovenia and Croatia began operating independently from Yugoslavia. Slovenia took over its own borders and began printing its own money.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_modern_Croatia)(http://tinyurl.com/p5rhu)(SFC, 5/26/96, T-5)

1991        Dec, Germany gave diplomatic recognition to Slovenia and Croatia. The EU said it would recognize Croatia and Slovenia as independent states.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)(SFC, 10/6/00, p.A19)

1991        In Ljubljana, Slovenia, the countercultural center of Metelkova began at an abandoned Yugoslavian army garrison following independence.
    (SSFC, 5/23/04, p.D9)
 
1992        Jan 15, The Yugoslav federation, founded in 1918, effectively collapsed as the European Community recognized the republics of Croatia and Slovenia.
    (AP, 1/15/98)

1992        Jan, A cease fire was arranged by US Sec. of State Cyrus Vance. The EC recognized the independence of Croatia and Slovenia. The UN approved deployment of a peace keeping force in Yugoslavia.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)   

1992        May, Bosnia, Croatia and Slovenia joined the UN.
    (SFC, 6/11/96, p.A14)   

1992        Dec, In the first democratic elections Milan Kucan was elected president and Janez Drnovsek became prime minister.
    (SFC, 4/14/97, p.A10)

1994        Istria was the first region of the former Yugoslavia to be officially designated as a "Region of Europe". The Istria of 2005, alternatively called Istra and Istrija, is politically divided into three separate countries: Croatia, Slovenia and Italy.
    (www.istrians.com/istria/maps/)

1996        May 18, The pope arrived at Ljubljana’s Brnik airport. He was greeted by Pres. Milan Kucan and other dignitaries.
    (SFC, 5/18/96, p.A-10)

1996        May 29, The property claims dispute with Italy has stalled Slovenia’s entry into the EC. A new offer has been made by Slovenia to open its property market fully within four years of signing an EC association agreement, thus allowing Italian claimants to buy back lost property.
    (WSJ, 5/29/96, p.A6)

1996        Nov 10, Premier Janez Drnovsek won parliamentary elections but failed to win a majority of seats.
    (SFC, 11/11/96, p.A11)

1999        Jun 21, Pres. Clinton visited Slovenia, met with Pres. Milan Kucan, and praised the country for standing up to Milosevic and declaring independence.
    (SFC, 6/22/99, p.A12)

2000        Dec 10, Slovenia re-established diplomatic ties with Yugoslavia.
    (WSJ, 12/11/00, p.A1)

2002        Sep 10, Martin Strel of Slovenia finished swimming the 2,360-mile length of the Mississippi. He began July 4 and covered 11-12 miles per day.
    (WSJ, 9/11/02, p.A1)

2002        Oct 9, The European Union's executive Commission declared Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and Slovakia nearly ready for EU membership and recommended they be invited to join in 2004. Romania and Bulgaria likely will be delayed until 2007 because of weak economies, the Commission said, adding Turkey was the weakest link among candidates.
    (AP, 10/9/02)

2002        Nov 10, In Slovenia PM Janez Drnovsek, who has pushed to align the tiny alpine nation closer with Western Europe, finished 1st in presidential elections but will have to face a runoff.
    (AP, 11/11/02)

2002        Nov 21, The Baltic nations of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania joined former communist states Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia as the next wave of NATO states.
    (AP, 11/21/02)

2002        Dec 1, PM Janez Drnovsek (52) won Slovenia's presidential election and promised to keep the former Yugoslav republic on a pro-Western course. In 1999 he had a cancerous kidney removed, and in 2005 revealed that doctors had diagnosed "formations" on his lungs and liver in 2001.
    (AP, 12/2/02)(SSFC, 12/2/02, p.a10)(AP, 9/29/06)

2002        Dec 13, The EU reached agreement to accept 10 new countries in 2004. These included Czech Republic, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia.
    (SFC, 12/14/02, p.A3)

2003        Mar 23, Slovenes endorsed membership in NATO and the European Union.
    (AP, 3/23/03)(AP, 3/24/03)

2004        Mar 29, Pres. Bush hosted a White House ceremony to welcome Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia into the NATO alliance.
    (WSJ, 3/30/04, p.A1)

2004        Apr 2, In Brussels an official ceremony welcomed Bulgaria, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia into the NATO alliance.
    (SFC, 4/3/04, p.A11)

2004        Apr 4, In Slovenia some 95 percent of referendum voters opposed reinstating permanent residency and other rights to more than 18,000 people, mostly Bosnians, Croats and Serbs, whose names were stricken from state records following independence from the former Yugoslavia in 1991.
    (AP, 4/5/04)

2004        Apr 27, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and EU officials signed an accord extending the EU-Russia partnership accord to Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Cyprus and Malta, which join May 1.
    (AP, 4/27/04)

2004        May 1, Revelers across ex-communist eastern Europe celebrated their historic entry to the European Union. 10 new members (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia) joined. Malta joined with 70 exemptions to EU rules. Poland had 43 exemptions. Latvia had 32. The Turkish occupied area of Cyprus was suspended from entry.
    (AP, 5/1/04)(Econ, 2/28/04, p.50)(Econ, 4/16/05, p.16)

2004        Oct 3, Slovenians voted in parliamentary elections. Janez Jansa’s right-leaning party won weekend elections and promised to maintain Slovenia's pro-Western course after taking power from the Liberal Democrats.
    (AP, 10/4/04)(WSJ, 10/4/04, p.A1)

2004        Nov 9, In Slovenia Janez Jansa (b.1956) took office as prime minister. He continued in office until 2008.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janez_Jan%C5%A1a)

2005        Jan 1, Slovenia was forecast for 3.7% annual GDP growth with a population at 2 million and GDP per head at $17,700.
    (Econ, 1/8/05, p.89)

2005        Jan 22, Donald Trump married Slovenian model Melania Knauss with all the glamour, glitz and gold that money and star power can buy.
    (AP, 1/23/05)

2005        Apr 23, Prof. Slavoj Zizek, Slovenian philosopher and cultural theorist of the Univ. of Ljubljana, attended the world premier of the documentary film “Zizek" in San Francisco, Ca. His books included “Welcome to the Desert of the Real: Five Essays on September 11 and Related Dates" (2002).
    (SSFC, 4/24/05, p.A1)

2005        May 24, In Slovenia police said Mitja Ribicic (86), a former Yugoslav secret service leader, has been charged in connection with the revenge killing of thousands of Slovenes following World War II, the first such charge in this ex-Yugoslav republic.
    (AP, 5/24/05)

2005        Jul, Italian police arrested two Slovenians who allegedly mailed steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs to U.S. soldiers in Iraq and other customers around the world.
    (AP, 8/1/05)

2006        Feb 16, A government spokesman said a swan found in Slovenia this month died of the lethal H5N1 avian flu virus strain, according to laboratory tests performed in Italy.
    (Reuters, 2/16/06)

2006        Jun 16, EU leaders gave Slovenia a green light to join the eurozone next year, launching a new wave of expansion for the currently 12-nation single currency club. EU leaders also gave their backing to the assessment of the EU's executive arm that Lithuania would not be ready to join the eurozone next year because inflation had overshot the limit required to join.
    (AFP, 6/16/06)

2006        Jul 11, EU finance ministers made Slovenia the 13th member of the euro zone. This gave Slovenia 5 months to print and mint euro notes to replace the tolar on January 1.
    (WSJ, 7/12/06, p.A10)

2007        Jan 1, Slovenia adopted the euro, becoming the 13th EU nation to use the single European currency. The transition to the euro included a 14-day period for dual use of the euro and Slovene tolar.
    (WSJ, 12/30/06, p.A4)(AP, 1/1/07)

2007        Mar 1, In Brazil Slovenian Martin Strel approached the halfway point of his attempt to swim the entire length of the Amazon river, trying to avoid severe burns, alligators and the dreaded bloodsucking toothpick fish.
    (AP, 3/1/07)

2007        Apr 7, In Brazil Martin Strel, a 52-year-old Slovenian, completed a 3,272 swim down the Amazon River that could set a world record for distance. In 2000, he completed an 1,866-mile swim along the Danube. He broke that record two years later after swimming 2,360 miles down the Mississippi. In 2004 he broke it again by swimming 2,487 miles along the Yangtze river in China.
    (AP, 4/8/07)

2007        Oct 21, Lojze Peterle, a conservative former prime minister, won the most votes in Slovenia's tight presidential elections, but fell far short of the majority needed to avoid a runoff.
    (AP, 10/21/07)

2007        Nov 17, Slovenian trade unions, students and pensioners staged the largest rally in the country since independence in 1991, blocking traffic in the centre of Ljubljana for several hours.
    (AP, 11/17/07)

2007        Dec 20, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia and the Czech Republic halted land and sea border controls at midnight in a wave of new members of Europe's passport-free Schengen zone. They all joined the EU on May 1, 2004.
    (AFP, 12/20/07)(WSJ, 12/21/07, p.A1)

2008        Jan 1, Slovenia became the first of 12 newcomers to take over the rotating presidency of the EU Union, a big psychological boost to a nation that gained independence from the ruins of the former Yugoslavia 16 years ago.
    (AP, 1/1/08)

2008        Feb 23, Janez Drnovsek (57), former president of Slovenia, died. He helped lead Slovenia to independence from Yugoslavia and later enthralled many of his countrymen by adopting a New Age lifestyle.
    (AP, 2/23/08)

2008        Jun 10, President Bush, speaking in Slovenia at his final EU-US summit, said the United States and Europe must rally to keep Iran from developing a nuclear weapon, calling the threat an incredible danger to world peace.
    (AP, 6/10/08)

2008        Jul 3, In southeastern Slovenia two canoes were crushed running over a dam. The next day divers pulled seven bodies out of the Sava River and fought strong currents to search for five other people still missing.
    (AP, 7/4/08)

2008        Sep 1, Some three weeks before the Slovenian parliamentary elections, allegations were made in Finnish TV in a documentary broadcast by the Finnish national broadcasting company YLE that Slovenia’s PM Jansa had received bribes from the Finnish defense company Patria (73.2% of which is the property of the Finnish government) in the so-called Patria case. Jansa rejected all accusations as a media conspiracy concocted by left-wing Slovenian journalists, and asked YLE to provide evidence or to retract the story. Jansa's naming of individual journalists, including some of those behind the 2007 Petition Against Political Pressure on Slovenian Journalists, and the perceived use of diplomatic channels in an attempt to coerce the Finnish government into interfering with YLE editorial policy, drew criticism from media freedom organizations such as the International Press Institute.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janez_Jan%C5%A1a)

2009        Nov 14, Tomaz Humar (40), a veteran Slovenian climber, was found dead on Langtang Lirung in the Nepalese Himalayas days after he was injured and stranded on the 23,710-foot (7,227m) mountain.
    (AP, 11/14/09)

2008        Nov, In Slovenia the Slovenian Democratic Party lost to the left wing coalition. PM Janez Jansa was replaced by the Social Democrat leader Borut Pahor.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janez_Jan%C5%A1a)

2008        Slavoj Zizek, Slovenian writer, authored “Violence." It was a smaller offspring of his larger book “In Defense of Lost Causes," also published this year.
    (SSFC, 9/28/08, Books p.7)

2009        Jul, Slovenian prosecutors charged a Finnish journalist who had quoted unnamed sources alleging that former PM Janez Jansa (2004-2008) had taken bribes.
    (Econ, 10/24/09, p.62)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janez_Jan%C5%A1a)

2010        Mar 20, Croatia and Slovenia hosted the 1st locally organized conference of the heads of government of the former Yugoslavia.
    (Econ, 4/3/10, p.54)

2010        Apr 19, The Slovenian parliament ratified a border arbitration deal with Croatia vital for Zagreb's EU membership bid, but the deal still faces a much tougher test at a June referendum in Slovenia.
    (Reuters, 4/19/10)

2010        May 27, Israel officially joined the OECD club of rich economies. PM Benjamin Netanyahu attended a ceremony at the Paris headquarters of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development as it welcomed Israel along with Estonia, Slovenia and Chile to the 31-nation grouping.
    (AFP, 5/27/10)

2010        Jul 18, In Slovenia a cyber mastermind, suspected of creating a malicious software code that infected 12 million computers worldwide and orchestrating other huge cyber scams, was arrested and questioned. His arrest came about five months after Spanish police broke up the massive cyber scam, arresting three of the alleged ringleaders who operated the Mariposa botnet, which stole credit cards and online banking credentials. On July 28 the FBI later said that a 23-year old Slovene known as Iserdo was picked up in Maribor, after lengthy investigation by Slovenian police, FBI and Spanish authorities. The FBI also identified, for the first time, the three individuals arrested in connection with the case in Spain: Florencio Carro Ruiz, known as "Netkairo;" Jonathan Pazos Rivera, known as "Jonyloleante;" and Juan Jose Bellido Rios, known as "Ostiator.
    (AP, 7/28/10)

2010        Sep 7, In Slovenia a government expert said a mass grave has been discovered containing bodies of about 700 victims killed by antifascists in the wake of World War II. Researchers examined a pit in a forest near the town of Prevalje in the country's northeast last week and discovered the bodies.
    (AP, 9/7/10)

2010        Oct 24, Slovenia elected Peter Bossman (54), a Ghana-born physician, as its first black mayor. He is known as the "Obama of Piran," the town where he lives.
    (AP, 10/24/10)

2010        Nov 23, Croatia’s Atlantic Grupa food company took over Slovenia’s Droga Kolinska for $326 million. This was the biggest corporate deal in the Balkans in recent years.
    (Econ, 11/27/10, p.72)

2010        Dec 9, Former Croatian PM Ivo Sanader, under investigation in a corruption case, left the country crossing into Slovenia, hours before parliament voted on lifting his immunity from prosecution so that he could be detained.
    (AP, 12/9/10)

2011        Jun,  The FBI and Interpol conducted "Operation Hive," which resulted in the arrests of two Metulji operators in Bosnia and Slovenia. The world's biggest criminal botnet, that has enslaved tens of millions of computers across 172 countries, was named “Metulji," Slovenian for "butterfly."
    (http://tinyurl.com/4346r4y)

2011        Oct 4, It was reported that NASA has awarded a Pennsylvania company, Pipistrel-USA.com of State College, a $1.35 million prize for developing an ultra-efficient electric airplane. Wired Magazine reported that the winning airplane "was developed and built in Slovenia as a technology demonstrator for the airplane maker."
    (http://tinyurl.com/3nk4ndh)

2011        Dec 4, Slovenians voted in an early election expected to bring conservatives back to power, where they will have to tackle the country's mounting debt, unemployment and a looming recession. President Danilo Turk said that "the most important task of the new government will be to restart economy." The outgoing center-left government of PM Borut Pahor has failed to push through pension and labor reform requested by the EU. The center-left Positive Slovenia party won with 28.5% of the ballots.
    (AP, 12/4/11)(AP, 12/13/11)

2011        Dec 5, In Slovenia preliminary results show Positive Slovenia, a center-left party, defeated the favored conservatives. The results also indicated that women won 28 of 90 seats, the most since the country gained independence from the former Yugoslavia in 1991.
    (AP, 12/5/11)

2011        Dec 13, Slovenia’s state electoral commission said the center-left Positive Slovenia party won 28.5% of the Dec 4 ballots, or 28 seats in the 90-member parliament. That is not enough for Positive Slovenia to form a government on its own.
    (AP, 12/13/11)

2012        Jan 27, Fitch ratings downgraded the debt of Belgium, Cyprus, Italy, Slovenia and Spain even as European finance chiefs gathering in Davos sought to reassure global business leaders that Europe is on track to solve its debt crises.
    (SFC, 1/27/12, p.A4)

2012        Feb 10, In Slovenia Janez Jansa (b.1958), a former prime minister (2004-2008) again took office as prime minister.
    (Economist, 9/22/12, p.63)

2012        Jul, Slovenia’s government bailed out the country’s  leading bank to the tune of some $478 million.
    (Economist, 9/22/12, p.63)

2012        Aug 23, In Slovenia a hot air balloon carrying 32 people, including children, was swept up in a storm and crashed in a fireball outside Ljubljana. 6 people died and 26 others were injured.
    (AP, 8/23/12)(AP, 2/26/13)

2012        Nov 11, Slovenians voted for a president, hoping whoever wins will boost the prospects of the small, economically struggling country. Competing were incumbent President Danilo Turk (60), former PM Borut Pahor (49) and ruling center-right coalition candidate, Milan Zver (50). No candidate appeared to win an outright majority and a runoff was expected next month between Turk and Pahor.
    (AP, 11/11/12)(AP, 11/12/12)

2012        Nov 30, In Slovenia thousands joined protests against PM Janez Jansa and his cabinet, accusing them of corruption and fraud and demanding their resignation.
    (SFC, 12/1/12, p.A2)

2012        Dec 2, Slovenia held a presidential runoff pitting anti-austerity incumbent Danilo Turk against former PM Borut Pahor, who has supported some of the government's budget measures during his campaign. Borut Pahor won the presidential election, calling for unity.
    (AP, 12/2/12)

2013        Jan 8, Slovenia’s official anti-corruption commission said PM Janez Jansa and opposition leader Zoran Jankovic had questions to answer.
    (Econ, 1/19/13, p.55)

2013        Jan 11, In Slovenia some 10,000 protesters urged PM Janez Jansa and opposition leader Zoran Jankovic to resign after an official report accused them of graft.
    (SFC, 1/12/13, p.A2)

2013        Jan 23, In Slovenia a massive austerity strike began as the the main coalition partner walked out of the government over corruption allegations against PM Janez Jansa.
    (SFC, 1/24/13, p.A2)

2013        Feb 8, In Slovenia thousands of people rallied for and against the center-right government, adding to the tensions in the small European Union country where authorities have turned to austerity measures to revive the economy.
    (AP, 2/8/13)

2013        Feb 27, Slovenia’s Parliament ousted PM Janez Jansa and his conservative government. The 55-33 no-confidence vote named Alenka Bratusek (42) as prime minister designate.
    (SFC, 2/28/13, p.A2)

2013        Mar 20, Slovenian lawmakers approved the new-left-leaning Cabinet of PM Alenka Bratusek, the first female to lead the government since secession from Yugoslavia in 1991.
    (SFC, 3/21/13, p.A2)

2013        May 9, Slovenia’s government announced an austerity plan designed to raise $707 million in new taxes as part of an effort to balance the budget and avoid seeking an int’l. bailout.
    (SFC, 5/10/13, p.A2)

2013        May 29, The EU granted France, Spain, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal and Slovenia more time to bring their budget deficits under control to support the bloc's shrinking economy. The European Commission approved France’s request to postpone by 2 years the target of cutting its budget deficit to 3% of GDP.
    (AP, 5/29/13)(Econ, 6/1/13, p.55)

2014        Feb 2, Tens of thousands of people are without electricity in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia after icy rain and sleet caused major disruptions. Hundreds of motorists were evacuated overnight from their vehicles in Serbia, where massive snow drifts have caused widespread travel chaos.
    (AP, 2/2/14)

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Subject = Slovenia
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