Today in History - May 8

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615        May 8, St. Boniface IV ended his reign as Catholic Pope.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

685        May 8, St. Benedict II ended his reign as Catholic Pope.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1319        May 8, Haakon V, King of Norway (1299-1319), died.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1429        May 8, French troops under Joan of Arc rescued Orleans.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1450        May 8, Kentishmen revolted against King Henry VI in Jack Cade's Rebellion.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1521        May 8, Peter Canisius, [Pieter de Hondt/Kanijs], Jesuit, saint, was born.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1521        May 8, Emperor Charles V and the Diet issued the Edict of Worms. It banned Luther’s work and enjoined his detention, but was not able to be enforced.
    (NH, 9/96, p.20)

1541        May 8, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto discovered and crossed the Mississippi River, which he called Rio de Espiritu Santo. He encountered the Cherokee Indians, who numbered about 25,000 and inhabited the area from the Ohio River to the north to the Chattahoochee in present day Georgia, and from the valley of the Tennessee east across the Great Smoky Mountains to the Piedmont of the Carolinas.
    (NG, 5/95, p.78)(AP, 5/8/97)(HN, 5/8/99)

1559        May 8, An act of supremacy defined Queen Elizabeth I as the supreme governor of the church of England. Soon after Elizabeth I took power in 1558 some 200 Catholics were strangled and disemboweled.
    (HN, 5/8/99)(Econ, 9/18/10, p.72)

1639        May 8, William Coddington founded Newport, RI.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1660        May 8, The son of the late Charles I is proclaimed King ending 11 years of civil war.
    (PCh, 1992, p.248)

1668        May 8, Alain Rene Lesage, French novelist and dramatist, was born. He is best known for his works "The Adventures of Gil Blas" and "Turcaret."
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1725        May 8, John Lovewell, US Indian fighter, died in battle.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1737        May 8, Edward Gibbon, English historian, author of “Decline and Fall of Roman Empire," was born. [see April 27, 1737] "All that is human must be retrograde if it does not advance."
    (HN, 5/8/98)(AP, 2/27/00)

1741        May 8, France and Bavaria signed the Covenant of Nymphenburg.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1753        May 8, Miguel Hidalgo y Castilla, the father of Mexican independence, was born.
    (HN, 5/8/98)(MC, 5/8/02)

1759        May 8, Hearing of his appointment in the west, General Napoleon Bonaparte left for Paris in order to obtain a different posting.
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1792        May 8, US established a military draft.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1792        May 8, British Capt. George Vancouver sighted and named Mt. Rainier, Wash.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1794        May 8, Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier, the father of modern chemistry (identified oxygen), was executed on the guillotine during France's Reign of Terror. In 2005 Madison Smartt Bell authored “Lavoisier in the Year One: The Birth of a New Science in the Age of Revolution."
    (AP, 5/8/97)(SSFC, 7/3/05, p.E1)

1823        May 8, "Home Sweet Home" was 1st sung in London.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1824        May 8, William Walker, president of Nicaragua, was born.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1828        May 8, Jean Henri Dunant (d.1910), Swiss philanthropist, was born. He founded the Int’l. Committee of the Red Cross and was the first recipient (jointly) of the Nobel Peace Prize.
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1829        May 8, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (d.1869), American pianist, was born in New Orleans.
    (HN, 5/8/02)(http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/gottschalk.html)

1840        May 8, Alexander Wolcott patented a photographic process.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1845        May 8 - 1845 May 12, The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) was founded. The SBC became a separate denomination in Augusta, Georgia, following a regional split with northern Baptists over the issues of slavery.
    (Econ, 3/17/12, p.36)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Baptist_Convention)

1846        May 8, News reached Washington DC that Mexican troops had attacked a US reconnaissance patrol near the Rio Grande and killed or captured some 40 men. That same afternoon Polk and his cabinet had decided to ask Congress for a declaration of war against Mexico.
    (AH, 6/07, p.44)
1846        May 8, The first major battle of the Mexican-American War was fought at Palo Alto, Texas; US forces led by General Zachary Taylor were able to beat back the invading Mexican forces.
    (AP, 5/8/07)

1852        May 8, A war between Denmark and Prussia lasted three years (1848–50) and ended only when the Great Powers pressured Prussia into accepting the London Protocol of 1852. This was the revision of an earlier protocol, which had been ratified on August 2, 1850, by the major Germanic powers of Austria and Prussia. The 1852 London Protocol confirmed that the duchies of Schleswig-Holstein should remain undivided.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Protocol)(Econ, 6/23/12, p.20)

1858        May 8, John Brown held an antislavery convention.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1861        May 8, Richmond, Va, was named the capital of the Confederacy.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1862        May 8, General 'Stonewall' Jackson repulsed the Federals at the Battle of McDowell, in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign.
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1864        May 8, Union troops arrived at Spotsylvania Court House to find the Confederates waiting for them.
    (HN, 5/8/99)
1864        May 8, The Atlanta Campaign saw severe fighting at Rocky Face Ridge.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1870        May 8, In France a national plebiscite voted confidence in the Empire with about 84% of votes in favor. On the eve of the plebiscite members of the Paris Federation were arrested on a charge of conspiring against Napoleon III. This pretext was further used by the government to launch a campaign of persecution of the members of the International throughout France.
    (www.marxists.org/history/france/paris-commune/timeline.htm)

1873        May 8, Melvil Dewey (d.1931) presented the 1st draft of his decimal classification system to the Amherst College Library Committee. [see 1876]
    (ON, 3/04, p.12)
1873        May 8, John Stuart Mill (b.1806), British philosopher and economist, died in Avignon, France. He completed his autobiography just before death. Here he wrote that happiness is the incidental by-product of pursuing some other worthy goal.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stuart_Mill)(Econ, 4/21/12, p.84)

1880        May 8, Gustave Flaubert (b.1821), French novelist, died. He revealed in painful detail the small foibles of a bourgeois life and believed in perfection of form and the absolute value of art. His work included "Madam Bovary," "Salammbo" and "A Simple Heart." "Our ignorance of history causes us to slander our own times." In 2006 Frederick Brown authored “Flaubert: A Biography."
    (V.D.-H.K.p.278)(AP, 6/19/99)(HN, 12/12/99)(WSJ, 4/15/06, p.P8)

1881        May 8, Henry Morton Stanley signed a contract with a Congo monarch. [see Sep 24]
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1884        May 8, Harry S. Truman, 33rd President of the United States (1945-1953), was born near Lamar, Mo. A history buff, President Harry Truman penned this description of Franklin Pierce, the 14th president, “Pierce was the best looking President the White House ever had—but as President he ranks with Buchanan and Calvin Coolidge." "If there is one basic element in our Constitution, it is civilian control of the military." He decided to drop the bomb that ended World War II and sent troops to Korea to halt communist aggression.
    (AP, 5/8/97)(AP, 1/17/99)(HN, 5/8/99)

1895        May 8, China ceded Taiwan to Japan under the Apr 17 Treaty of Shimonoseki. This followed a war over control of the Korean peninsula. Japan began administering the Senkaku Islands between Okinawa and Taiwan following the Treaty of Shimonoseki. Japanese occupation ended in 1945. The US took over after WW II but returned them to Japan in 1972. China later disputed Japanese control of the islands.
    (SFEC, 10/8/96, A8)(Econ, 1/15/05, Survey p.4)(SSFC, 2/18/07, p.G5)(Econ, 9/25/10, p.54)

1886        May 8, Atlanta pharmacist John Stith Pemberton invented the flavor syrup for Coca-Cola, which contained cocaine. The name for the soft drink came from his bookkeeper, Frank Robinson. Sales of Coca-Cola at the soda fountain of Jacob‘s Pharmacy averaged 9 drinks a day in the first year. [see Mar 29]
    (AP, 5/8/97)(HN, 5/8/98)(www.sodamuseum.bigstep.com/generic.jhtml?pid=1)

1887        May 8, Alexander Ulyanov, brother of Lenin, was hanged for assassination of tsar.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1891        May 8, Helena Petrovna Blavatskaya (b.1831), Russian theosophist (Madame Blavatsky), died.
    (WUD, 1994 p.157)(MC, 5/8/02)

1895        May 8, Edmund Wilson, American critic and essayist, was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)
1895        May 8, China ceded Taiwan to Japan under the Apr 17 Treaty of Shimonoseki. This followed a war over control of the Korean peninsula. Japanese occupation ended in 1945.
    (HN, 5/8/98)(Econ, 1/15/05, Survey p.4)(SSFC, 2/18/07, p.G5)

1899        May 8, Friedrich August von Hayek (d.1992), Austrian-born British economist. He found solutions to problems proposed by Keynesian economics. He was dedicated to illuminating the problems of socialism and held that inflation, unemployment and recession result from governmental interference. He won a Nobel prize in 1974.
    (WSJ, 1/11/99, p.R20)

1902        May 8, Mt. Pelee volcano, on the French Island of Martinique in the east W. Indies, blew its top and wiped out the town of St. Pierre. A pyroclastic flow killed 29-40 thousand people. In 1972 Jacques Petitjean Roget published a detailed report on the event. In 2002 Alwyn Scarth authored “La Catastrophe."
    (SFC, 8/13/01, p.A4)(SFC, 1/19/02, p.A14)(NH, 10/02, p.76)

1903        May 8, Joseph Desire Fernandel, comedian (Grand Chef), was born in Marseilles, France.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1903        May 8, Paul Gauguin (b.1848), French born painter, died at his home on the Marquesas Islands. He was buried at Atuona on Hiva Oa Island.
    (SFEC, 8/25/96, p.T6)(SSFC, 6/2/02, p.C9)

1904        May 8, U.S. Marines landed in Tangier to protect the Belgian legation.
    (HN, 5/8/98)
1904        May 8, Eadweard J. Muybridge (b.1830 as Edward Muggeridge), English photographer, died in England. He had spent much of his life in the USA and is known for his pioneering work on animal locomotion which used multiple cameras to capture motion, and his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eadweard_Muybridge)(Econ, 10/9/10, p.122)

1906        May 8, Roberto Rossellini, Italian film director, was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)

1910        May 8, Mary Lou Williams, jazz pianist and composer, was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)
1910        May 8, Ricardo Jimenez Oreamuno (b.1859) began serving his first term as president of Costa Rica. In 1914 he was succeeded by Alfredo Gonzalez Flores.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricardo_Jim%C3%A9nez_Oreamuno)

1913        May 8, California lawmakers passed Assembly bill 2039, an anti-tipping measure with penalties for both giving and receiving tips.
    (SSFC, 5/5/13, p.46)

1914        May 8, William Wadsworth Hodkinson (1881-1971) merged 11 film rental bureaus to create the first US-wide distributor of feature films, Paramount Pictures.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wadsworth_Hodkinson)

1919        May 8, The first transatlantic flight took-off by a US Navy seaplane.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1920        May 8, Sloan Wilson, American author, was born in Norwalk, Conn. He wrote "The man in the Gray Flannel Suit" and "A Summer Place."
    (HN, 5/8/99)(MC, 5/8/02)

1921        May 8, Sweden abolished capital punishment.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1924        May 8, Arthur Honegger's "Pacifica 231," premiered.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1924        May 8, Ricardo Jimenez Oreamuno (b.1859) began serving his 2nd term as president of Costa Rica. In 1928 he was succeeded by Cleto Gonzalez Viquez.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricardo_Jim%C3%A9nez_Oreamuno)

1927        May 8, Sister Miriam Teresa Demjanovich (b.1901), a New Jersey nun, died. In 2014 she was beatified for allegedly curing a boy’s macular degeneration.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa_Demjanovich)(SFC, 10/5/14, p.A5)
1927        May 8, French pilots Charles Nungesser and Francois Coli took off from Paris in their airplane named L’Oiseau Blanc (the White Bird), in an attempt to cross the Atlantic. Pilots and plane vanished during the flight.
    (ON, 2/08, p.2)

1928        May 8, Theodore Sorenson, presidential advisor to John F. Kennedy, was born. Many suspect that he ghost-wrote Kennedy's book "Profiles in Courage."
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1930        May 8, Gary Snyder, beat poet, was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)
1930        May 8, The Richfield Oil Company tanker Richfield wrecked on the rocks off Point Reyes, Ca., with a cargo or 25,000 gallons of high-test gasoline.
    (SFC, 5/6/05, p.F3)

1931        May 8, Franz Lehar's operetta, “Land of Smiles," premiered in London.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1932        May 8, Ricardo Jimenez Oreamuno (b.1859) began serving his 3rd term as president of Costa Rica.  In 1936 he was succeeded by Leon Cortes Castro.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricardo_Jim%C3%A9nez_Oreamuno)

1933        May 8, Gandhi began a hunger strike to protest British oppression in India.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1937        May 8, Thomas Pynchon, novelist (Gravity's Rainbow), was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)

1940        May 8, Peter Benchley, novelist (Jaws, The Deep), was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)
1940        May 8, Ricky Nelson, rock star (Hello Mary Lou, It's Late, Garden Party), was born in NJ.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1940        May 8, German commandos in Dutch uniforms crossed the Dutch border to hold bridges for the advancing German army.
    (HN, 5/8/99)

1942        May 8, Battle of the Coral Sea between the Japanese Navy and the U.S. Navy ended as a tactical victory for the Japanese. They sank more tons of ships than the U.S. did. It was a strategic victory for the U.S. in that the Japanese were halted in their drive south. The aircraft carrier Lexington was sunk by Japanese air attack at Coral Sea.
    (HN, 5/8/99)(MC, 5/8/02)
1942        May 8, German summer offensive opened in Crimea.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1944        May 8, The first "eye bank" was established, in New York City.
    (AP, 5/8/97)

1945        May 8, Keith Jarrett, jazz musician, film composer (Nachtfahrer), was born in Allentown, Pa. http://www.ecmrecords.com/ecm/bio/47.html
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1945        May 8, Life photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt got signalman Jim Reynolds to pose for a kiss with a nurse in a famous photo that later appeared in life Magazine’s issue of Aug 27. This was denied by Life and not verified by Reynolds.
    (WSJ, 8/14/96, p.A14)(WSJ, 8/20/96, p.A11)
1945        May 8, Algerian demonstrators in the town of Setif unfurled an Algerian flag, banned by the French occupiers. As police began confiscating the flags, the crowds turned on the French, killing about two dozen of them. This led to an uprising in which Algerians say some 45,000 people may have died. Figures in France put the number at about 15,000 to 20,000. No one is quite sure.
    (AP, 5/9/05)
1945        May 8, Germany surrendered and Victory in Europe was achieved by the allies. Marshal Wilhelm Keitel surrenders to Marshal Zhukov. The day is commemorated as V-E Day. President Truman announced in a radio address that World War II had ended in Europe. In 2004 Max Hastings authored “Armageddon," an account of the last days of WW II.
    (WSJ, 5/5/95, p.A-12)(AP, 5/8/97)(WSJ, 11/16/04, p.D10)
1945        May 8, Oskar Schindler gave a speech and urged the Jews who worked for him not to pursue revenge attacks. An original list of 1,200 of his workers at the Plaszow concentration camp was found in 1999.
    (SFC, 10/16/99, p.A13)

1949        May 8, The Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Grundgesetz für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland), was formally approved. It was subsequently ratified by all states except Bavaria. With the signature of the Allies it came into effect on May 23, 1949, as the constitution of West Germany.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_Law_for_the_Federal_Republic_of_Germany)(EWH, 1968, p.1180)

1950        May 8, The US Government convinced that neither national independence nor democratic evolution exist in any area dominated by Soviet imperialism, considers the situation to be such as to warrant its according economic aid and military equipment to the Associated State of Indochina and to France in order to assist them in restoring stability and permitting these states to pursue their peaceful and democratic development.
    (www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/pentagon/pent1.html)

1951        May 8, Dacron men's suits were introduced.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1952        May 8, Beth Henley, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright (Crimes of the Heart), was born.
    (HN, 5/7/02)
1952        May 8, Allied fighter-bombers staged the largest raid of the war on North Korea.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1956        May 8, John Osborne’s "Look Back in Anger," premiered in London at the Royal Court Theater. It was about a love triangle involving an intelligent but disaffected young man (Jimmy Porter), his upper-middle-class, impassive wife (Alison), and her haughty best friend (Helena Charles). It took English theater on a radical turn. In 1958 it was made into a movie. In 2006 John Heilpern authored “John Osborne: A Patriot for Us."
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Look_Back_in_Anger)(SFEC, 4/11/99, DB p.39)(Econ, 5/20/06, p.86)

1958        May 8, Vice President Nixon was shoved, stoned, booed and spat upon by anti-American protesters in Lima, Peru.
    (AP, 5/8/97)

1959        May 8, A 3-deck Nile excursion steamer sprang a leak panicking passengers who capsized the ship. 200 drowned just yards from shore.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1962        May 8, The Stephen Sondheim musical comedy "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" opened at the Alvin Theater in NYC for 965 performances.
    (AP, 5/8/97)(SFEC, 5/31/98, BR p.6)(MC, 5/8/02)
1962        May 8, London trolley buses went out of service.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1963        May 8, "Dr. No" premiered in US.
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1963        May 8, JFK offered Israel assistance against aggression.
    (MC, 5/8/02)

1967        May 8, Boxer Muhammad Ali (b.1942) was indicted for refusing induction in US Army.
    (www.cyberboxingzone.com/boxing/alirec.htm)

1968        May 8, William Styron (1925-2006), a white author, received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for “The Confessions of Nat Turner" (1967). The book was based on the true story of an 1831 slave revolt in Virginia. Some black intellectuals, including Cornell historian John Henrik Clarke, published a critical response to the book.
    (www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/rfk/sfeature/sf_1968_text_05.html)

1969        May 8, The Academy Award Oscar for best 1968 documentary was given to runner-up “Journey Into Self," after it was found that “Young Americans," the original winner had been shown in a theater in October, 1967, making it ineligible for the 1968 award. Alex Grasshoff had directed the “Young Americans," a chronicle of a summer tour by the singing group.
    (SFC, 4/22/08, p.B5)(http://theoscarsite.com/pictures1968/journeyintoself.htm)

1970        May 8, Beatles released their "Let it Be" album. [see Mar 6]
    (MC, 5/8/02)
1970        May 8, Anti-war protests took place across the United States and around the world. Construction workers broke up an anti-war protest on New York City's Wall Street.
    (AP, 5/8/07)

1972        May 8, In response to the ongoing NVA Easter Offensive, President Nixon announced Operation Linebacker I, the mining of North Vietnam's harbors along with intensified bombing of roads, bridges, and oil facilities. The announcement brought international condemnation of the US and ignited more anti-war protests in America.
    (www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/vietnam/index-1969.html)
1972        May 8, A Belgian Sabena aircraft, bound for Tel Aviv, was hijacked by 4 Palestinians. At Lod Intl. 2 hijackers were shot and killed by Israeli military personnel, dressed as ground engineers. One passenger died 8 days later as a result of her wounds. The two women hijackers were subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment.
    (www.prophetofdoom.net/Islamic_Terrorism_Timeline_1972.Islam)

1973        May 8, Militant American Indians who had held the South Dakota hamlet of Wounded Knee for 10 weeks surrendered.
    (AP, 5/8/97)

1974        May 8, William Simon (1927-2000), former Wall Street bond trader, began serving as the 63rd head of the US Treasury Dept. under Pres. Nixon. Simon was reappointed by President Ford and served until 1977. From 1977-1980 he served as treasurer of the US Olympic Committee.
    (SFEC, 6/4/00, p.C15)(WSJ, 6/7/00, p.A26)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_E._Simon)
1974        May 8, In Canada the government of Pierre Trudeau fell on a sub-amendment to the budget (thus a question of confidence).
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minority_governments_in_Canada)

1976        May 8, San Francisco city craft workers agreed to end their 38-day strike. City supervisors agreed to take Propositions E and K off the June ballot.
    (SFC, 5/4/01, WBb p.3)
1976        May 8, San Francisco Supervisor Richard Hongisto was slapped with a DUI by a Marin County judge. His sentence included a $784 fine and a 90-day driving restriction. A breath test measured his blood-alcohol level at .11, just abort the .10 limit.
    (SSFC, 5/8/11, DB p.46)
1976        May 8, McKendree Robbins Long (b.1888), Southern gothic painter and evangelical preacher, died in North Carolina. His work included: "Apocalyptic Scene With Philosophers and Historical Figures," and "The Fifth Angel Opens the Bottomless Pit."
    (SFC, 7/6/02, p.D6)(www.tfaoi.com/aa/3aa/3aa457.htm)

1977        May 8, The trial of Pieter Menten (b.1899), a former Dutch SS officer and art collector, began in Amsterdam. He was convicted and sentenced to 15 years, but the sentence was reduced to 10 years in 1980.
    (www.cnn.com/almanac/9805/08/)(http://tinyurl.com/2n79xl)

1978        May 8, David R. Berkowitz pleaded guilty in a Brooklyn courtroom to the "Son of Sam" killings that had terrified New Yorkers.
    (AP, 5/8/98)

1979        May 8, Radio Shack released TRSDOS 2.3.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-DOS)

1980        May 8, The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that smallpox had been eradicated from the wild.
    (www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/dm79sp.html)

1984        May 8, The album "Legend," the greatest hits by Bob Marley (1945-1981) and the Wailers, was released. It became the best-selling reggae record of all time.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend_(album))
1984        May 8, The Thames Barrier was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Total construction cost was around £534 m (£1.3 billion at 2001 prices) with an additional £100 m for river defenses. It was the world's largest movable flood barrier until Netherlands completed the Oosterscheldekering in 1986.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_Barrier)
1984        May 8, USSR announced it would not participate in Summer Olympics planned for Los Angeles.
    (HN, 5/8/98)

1986        May 8, In Costa Rica Oscar Arias (b.1940) began serving as president and continued to 1990. In 2006 he began serving a 2nd term as president.
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%93scar_Arias)
1986        May 8, In Venezuela 9 people were killed by security forces in the western town of Yumare. Interior minister Octavio Lepage described it as a clash with guerrillas — remnants of leftist rebel bands that largely had put down their weapons by the early 1970s.
    (AP, 3/16/08)

1987        May 8, An angry and defiant Gary Hart, dogged by questions about his personal life and his relationship with Miami model Donna Rice, withdrew from the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.
    (AP, 5/8/97)

1988        May 8, The 2nd American Comedy Award went to Robin Williams and Tracey Ullman. The event was broadcast on May 17.
    (http://tinyurl.com/zxn8k)(http://tinyurl.com/fjfb9)
1988        May 8, French President Francois Mitterrand was elected to a second seven-year term, defeating conservative challenger Jacques Chirac.
    (AP, 5/8/98)
1988        May 8, Science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein died in Carmel, Calif., at age 80.
    (AP, 5/8/98)

1989        May 8, Former President Carter, a leader of an international team observing Panama's elections, declared that the armed forces were defrauding the opposition of victory.
    (AP, 5/8/99)

1990        May 8, One crewman was killed, 18 others injured in a fire aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Conyngham in the Atlantic, about 100 miles southeast of Norfolk, Va.
    (AP, 5/8/00)
1990        May 8, NY Newsday reporter Jimmy Breslin was suspended for a racial slur.
    (http://www.totse.com/en/ego/literary_genius/yuh.html)

1991        May 8, At the Third Annual Governor’s Quality Management Conference at the Excelsior Hotel in Little Rock, Ark., Gov. Bill Clinton invited Paula Jones, a state employee working at the registration desk, to a private meeting and exposed his desire for her. Days later Paula Jones filed a complaint of sexual harassment in US District Court in Little Rock. She has been seeking $700,000 in damages.
    (WSJ, 6/26/96, p.A18)(SFC, 5/29/96, A4)(SFEC, 11/24/96, zone 1 p.9)(WSJ, 4/20/98, p.A20)
1991        May 8, CIA Director William H. Webster announced his retirement; he was eventually succeeded by Robert Gates.
    (AP, 5/8/01)
1991        May 8, General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf War, received a hero’s welcome as he addressed Congress.
    (AP, 5/8/01)
1991        May 8, Concert pianist Rudolf Serkin died in Guilford, Vermont, at age 88.
    (AP, 5/8/01)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Serkin)

1992        May 8, President Bush wound up two emotional days in riot-ravaged Los Angeles, promising to work harder in Washington to enact a "common-sense agenda" of conservative proposals to help urban America.
    (AP, 5/8/97)

1993        May 8, Keron Thomas (16) disguised himself as a motorman and took a NYC subway train and 2,000 passengers on a 3 hour ride.
    (www.mndaily.com/daily/gopher-archives/1993/05/14/Subway_joyride_ends_with_arrest.txt)
1993        May 8, The Muslim-led government of Bosnia-Herzegovina and rebel Bosnian Serbs signed an agreement for a nationwide cease-fire.
    (AP, 5/8/98)

1994        May 8, President Clinton announced a shift in U.S. policy toward Haitian refugees, saying there would be offshore screening of boat people seeking political asylum.
    (AP, 5/8/99)
1994        May 8, Actor George Peppard died at age 65.
    (AP, 5/8/99)

1995        May 8, Helmut Oberlander (b.1924), a former Nazi decorated for service in a death squad that executed 91,678 people in southern Russia, was extradited to Canada from Florida.
    (SSFC, 4/4/10, Par. p.5)(www.justice.gov/opa/pr/Pre_96/May95/261.txt.html)
1995        May 8, A monster storm began dumping 18 inches of rain on southeast Louisiana, flooding homes and killing five people.
    (AP, 5/8/00)
1995        May 8, Fifty years after Nazi Germany's capitulation in World War II, leaders representing the victorious powers gathered in Berlin to remember the dead and pledge peace for the future.
    (AP, 5/8/00)

1996        May 8, US postal inspectors wrapped up a two-year sting operation in 36 states against the nation's biggest child pornography ring.
    (AP, 5/8/97)
1996        May 8, Julie Andrews declined her Tony Award nomination after her show, "Victor/Victoria," was snubbed for best musical.
    (AP, 5/8/97)
1996        May 8, South Africa approved a National Constitution that guaranteed equal rights for all races. Zulu nationalists and white extremists boycotted the parliament vote and the entire process.
    (SFC, 5/8/96, p.A-19)(WSJ, 5/9/96, p.A-1)(AP, 5/8/97)
1996        May 8, In Pakistan a bomb killed at least 6 and injured 38 aboard a bus in Punjab province.
    (WSJ, 5/9/96, p.A-1)
1996        May 8, In Mexico a government task force in the state of Sinaloa issued a report on the mysterious chupacabras or “goat-sucker." An unknown creature has been killing goats and leaving fang marks. The report said: There is no goat sucker, but pollution is now so bad that it is driving animals mad, giving them the behavioral trappings of crazed alien creatures."
    (SFC, 5/11/96, p.A-10)

1997        May 8, President Clinton assured Central American leaders during a summit in Costa Rica that they need not fear mass deportations of immigrants who had sought refuge in the United States during U.S.-backed conflicts.
    (AP, 5/8/98)
1997        May 8, After months of railing against Democrats for taking foreign money, the Republican Party announced it had returned $122,400 in contributions from a Hong Kong company.
    (AP, 5/8/98)
1997        May 8, In Washington DC Jacqueline Thompson (32) gave birth to sextuplets. One was stillborn. No fertility drugs were used but both she and her husband Linden had a family history of multiple births.
    (SFEC,11/23/97, p.A7)
1997        May 8, In Japan a law was passed to preserve the culture of the aboriginal Ainu people who have inhabited northern Japan since prehistoric times.
    (SFC, 5/9/97, p.E3)
1997        May 8, In Zaire rebels were meeting increased resistance from French mercenaries and Angolan UNITA forces. A shortage of cash was also hindering their advance on Kinshasa.
    (WSJ, 5/9/97, p.A1)

1998        May 8, The tobacco industry agreed to pay $6.6 billion to settle a suit with the state of Minnesota as the state's lawsuit was about to go to a jury. The settlement included restrictions on sales and marketing with payments spread over 25 years. Minnesota became the fourth state to settle with the tobacco industry over the costs of treating smoking-related illnesses.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A3)(AP, 5/8/99)
1998        May 8, Eddie Rabbit, country music singer, died at age 53 of lung cancer. His songs included “Drivin’ My Life Away," “Every Which Way But Loose," and “Someone Could Lose a Heart Tonight."
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A21)
1998        May 8, In Brazil “Operation Drought" was launched to airlift food to the drought stricken northeast where 10 million people were threatened with hunger.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A12)
1998        May 8, In France a bomb exploded in Marseilles and damaged the Regional Council building. Corsican militants were suspected.
    (SFEC, 5/10/98, p.A22)
1998        May 8, In Mexico immigration authorities put a limit on human rights delegations to Chiapas. Groups of 10 people would only be allowed to stay 10 days.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A12)
1998        May 8, Norway authorized another season of hunting minke whales with a 30% allotment increase to 671.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A7)
1998        May 8, In Somalia fighting in Kismayo between rival militias left 23 dead and 30 wounded.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A12)
1998        May 8, In South Africa the National Sports Council asked the world to boycott South African Rugby in a move to push for the resignation of Louis Luyt, the league’s president, over racist and corrupt practices.
    (SFC, 5/9/98, p.A10)

1999        May 8, The Citadel, South Carolina's formerly all-male military school, graduated its first female cadet, Nancy Ruth Mace.
    (AP, 5/8/00)
1999        May 8, Dana Plato (34), a star of TV’s Diff'rent Strokes, died in a suburb of Oklahoma City. Authorities said she succumbed to an overdose of painkillers.
    (www.eonline.com/News/Items/0,1,19982,00.html?fdnews)
1999        May 8, British actor Sir Dirk Bogarde died in London at age 78.
    (AP, 5/8/00)
1999        May 8, US warplanes bombed northern Iraq as Iraqi TV reported 3 people were killed when 18 bombs fell on civilian and military positions.
    (SFEC, 5/9/99, p.A23)
1999        May 8, In Bangladesh 200 people were feared dead when a river ferry boat sank. About 100 people were rescued or swam to shore.
    (WSJ, 5/10/99, p.A1)
1999        May 8, In China protestors attacked US diplomatic mission in demonstrations against the NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade. Many of the demonstrations were organized by the government-controlled Beijing Students Assoc. NATO expressed regret for a mistaken attack on the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, but pledged to pursue the bombing campaign.
    (SFEC, 5/9/99, p.A1)(SFC, 5/10/99, p.A8)(AP, 5/8/00)
1999        May 8, In Iraq military forces attacked villages in Nasiriya, a Shiite Muslim city.
    (SFC, 5/12/99, p.C10)
1999        May 8, An estimated 7,500 Kosovars crossed the border into Albania.
    (SFEC, 5/9/99, p.A17)

2000        May 8, The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to ban discrimination based on weight or height.
    (AP, 5/8/01)
2000        May 8, Scientists announced that they had mapped chromosome 21 which is associated with Down syndrome, epilepsy, Lou Gehrig’s disease and Alzheimer’s.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A1)
2000        May 8, In New Mexico a controlled burn Bandolier National Monument near the Los Alamos National Laboratory blew out of control and 500 people were forced to evacuate the area.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A3)
2000        May 8, The remains of Cardinal John O’Connor were entombed inside New York’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral after a funeral Mass that drew thousands of mourners, including President Clinton.
    (AP, 5/8/01)
2000        May 8, In Congo the city of Kisangani (formerly Stanleyville) was declared a neutral zone as Rwanda and Uganda agreed to withdraw their troops from the area and allow UN forces to take over.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A12)
2000        May 8, In Iran 2 more Iranian Jews confessed to spying for Israel.
    (WSJ, 5/9/00, p.A1)
2000        May 8, In Japan Hogen Fukunaga, founder of the Hono Hana Sampogyo, cult was arrested on fraud charges. Members were told that they would get cancer or die if their feet were not inspected by Fukunaga.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A12)
2000        May 8, In the Philippines investigators arrested a Manila bank employee, Reomel Ramones, suspected in the creation of the “Love Bug" computer virus.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A1)
2000        May 8, In Puerto Rico the US Navy resumed practice bombing on Vieques Island with dummy bombs.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A3)
2000        May 8, In Sierra Leone bodyguards of Foday Sankoh fired into a crowd of pro-government protestors in Freetown and killed 7 people. Sankoh later disappeared.
    (SFC, 5/9/00, p.A1)(SFC, 5/10/00, p.A12)

2001        May 8, China rejected a US plan to repair EP-3 the spy plane and fly it away. China protested the resumption of U.S. surveillance flights off its coast and said it would refuse to let the United States fly out a crippled Navy spy plane.
    (WSJ, 5/9/01, p.A1)(AP, 5/8/02)
2001        May 8-9, In El Salvador some 100 small earthquakes hit the country over a 24-hour period.
    (SFC, 5/10/01, p.C5)
2001        May 8, In Hong Kong AOL Time Warner sponsored a business conference attended by Pres. Jiang Zemin of China and Bill Clinton. Followers of Falun Gong were barred from entering Hong Kong.
    (SFC, 5/9/01, p.A16)
2001        May 8, In Malta Pope John Paul II was welcomed on the final stop of his 6-day pilgrimage to retrace the steps of the Apostle Paul.
    (WSJ, 5/9/01, p.A1)
2001        May 8, In New Zealand Prime Minister Clark announced that the air force would be stripped of combat jets along with sharp cuts to the navy.
    (WSJ, 5/9/01, p.A1)
2001        May 8, In South Africa 12 miners were killed in a gold mine explosion.
    (WSJ, 5/9/01, p.A1)

2002        May 8, FBI Director Robert Mueller told a Senate committee an FBI memo from Phoenix warning that several Arabs were suspiciously training at a U.S. aviation school wouldn't have led officials to the Sept. 11 hijackers even if they'd followed up the warning with more vigor.
    (AP, 5/8/03)
2002        May 8, US Sec. of State Rumsfeld said the Pentagon would kill the $11 billion Crusader artillery system.
    (SFC, 5/8/02, p.A5)
2002        May 8, Abdullah Al Mujahir, also known as Jose Padilla, was arrested as he flew from Pakistan into Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Padilla was alleged to be al-Qaida connected and suspected of plotting to build and detonate a radioactive ''dirty'' bomb in an attack in the United States. A public announcement of his arrest was delayed until Jun 10. In 2008 Padilla was sentenced to just over 17 years in prison for terrorism-related charges. Adham Amin Hassoun was sentenced to over 15 years for recruiting Padilla. Kifah Wael Jayyousi was sentenced to over 12 years for financing the al-Qaida cell.
    (AP, 6/10/02)(SFC, 1/23/08, p.A4)
2002        May 8, In Israel a suicide bomber detonated himself prematurely. Israeli sappers used a robot to drag the man, still alive, across a road for inspection.
    (SFC, 5/8/02, p.A12)
2002        May 8, In Kenya the parliament approved an Amended Books and Newspapers Act that made it illegal to sell publications that had not been submitted to the government for review.
    (SFC, 5/10/02, p.A20)
2002        May 8, Fighting continued in western Nepal. Guerrillas regained control of Gam. The army reported 518 people killed, including 410 rebels, since May 2. Rebels offered a one-month cease-fire. The government rejected the offer.
    (SFC, 5/8/02, p.A9)(WSJ, 5/10/02, p.A1)(WSJ, 5/13/02, p.A1)
2002        May 8, In Pakistan a bomb destroyed a shuttle bus in Karachi. 11 of 14 dead were French naval engineers helping to build a submarine for Pakistan. Asif Zaheer and Mohammad Rizwan, who allegedly belonged to Al-Qaeda-linked extremist group Harkatul Mujahideen al-Aalmi, were found guilty in 2003 of assisting the suicide attack which also killed 3 Pakistanis. In May, 2009, a Pakistan court acquitted the two men sentenced to death over the bombing. Mohammad Sohail Habib, who also allegedly belonged to Al-Qaeda-linked extremist group Harkatul Mujahideen al-Aalmi, was sentenced to death in his absence in 2003 for assisting the suicide attack. Sohail was arrested in 2005 but was acquitted after a six-month re-trial in an anti-terrorism court ordered on appeal by the high court. In October, 2009, a Pakistani court acquitted Soheil for lack of evidence.
    (SFC, 5/8/02, p.A17)(SFC, 5/8/02, p.A8)(WSJ, 5/9/02, p.A1)(AFP, 5/5/09)(AFP, 10/30/09)

2003        May 8, The US Senate unanimously endorsed adding to NATO seven former communist nations: Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.
    (AP, 5/8/04)
2003        May 8, The US House International Relations Committee narrowly approved the measure saying that any accord on immigration issues with Mexico should include an agreement to allow U.S. companies to invest in the state oil company Pemex. The measure is a nonbinding "sense of Congress" amendment and still needed to be approved by both houses of Congress.
    (AP, 5/11/03)
2003        May 8, A federal grand jury indicted Chinese-born California socialite Katrina Leung on charges that she'd illegally taken, copied and kept secret documents obtained from an FBI agent. A federal judge later dismissed the case against Leung, rebuking prosecutors for misconduct.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2003        May 8, Halliburton Corp., already under fire over accusations that its White house ties helped win a major Iraqi oil contract, has admitted that a subsidiary paid a multi-million dollar bribe to a Nigerian tax official.
    (AP, 5/10/03)
2003        May 8, In Oklahoma a tornado swept through Oklahoma City and flattened hundreds of homes. At least 104 people were injured.
    (SFC, 5/8/03, p.A10)
2003        May 8, The Michigan Wolverines were barred from the next postseason and put on three and a-half years' probation by the NCAA for a booster's payments to players dating to the Fab Five era.
    (AP, 5/8/04)
2003        May 8, Elizabeth Neuffer (46), an award-winning reporter for The Boston Globe, died in a car accident in Iraq.
    (AP, 5/10/03)
2003        May 8, Rival tribal fighters battled for control of a northeastern Congolese town, killing at least 21 people and forcing thousands to flee. Fighters of the Union of Congolese Patriots, a rebel group dominated by Hema tribesmen, had attacked Bunia in a bid to seize its airport
    (AP, 5/8/03)
2003        May 8, A Russian-built cargo plane lost a back door ramp over Congo, hurling more than 100 Congolese soldiers and their families to their deaths.
    (Reuters, 5/9/03)(AP, 5/8/04)
2003        May 8, In Honduras 2 gunmen with automatic weapons fatally shot Arnulfo Gutierrez (62), an honorary Belgian consul as he drove his car in San Pedro Sula. His wife was kidnapped March 18 as she left a San Pedro Sula beauty parlor.
    (AP, 5/8/03)
2003        May 8, In Hungary a passenger train collided with a double-decker bus, slicing the bus in two. At least 30 people were killed, all German tourists on the bus.
    (AP, 5/8/03)
2003        May 8, Israeli helicopters fired 3 missiles at a car in northern Gaza, killing a senior Hamas militant.
    (AP, 5/8/03)

2004        May 8, Former Iraq hostage Thomas Hamill returned home to a chorus of cheering family and friends in Mississippi.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2004        May 8, In Bangladesh Ahsanullah Master, a member of the main opposition Awami League, was killed.
    (AP, 5/9/04)
2004        May 8, Gunmen loyal to radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr rampaged through Basra and Amarah, attacking British patrols and government buildings. Witnesses in Basra reported 9 militiamen killed in the fighting. One child was killed when his house was struck by a projectile. Attackers in Habhab set off a bomb outside the house of a police official killing three members of his family and wounding three others. A pipeline was bombed and slowed the flow of export oil by as much as 25%.
    (AP, 5/8/04)(SFC, 5/11/04, p.A9)

2005        May 8, Steve Nash edged Shaquille O'Neal by 34 points to win the NBA's most valuable player award.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2005        May 8, In Zion, Ill., Laura Hobbs (8) and Krystal Tobias (9), out on a Mother's Day bicycle ride, were stabbed multiple times and left to die near a bike path. Laura’s father Jerry Hobbs (34), just out of a Texas prison a few weeks, led police to the girls' bodies in a ravine. He was charged with murder on the second day of questioning by police.
    (AP, 5/10/05)(AP, 5/11/05)
2005        May 8, Lloyd Cutler (87), White House counsel to Presidents Carter and Clinton and adviser to presidents of both parties, died at his Washington home.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2005        May 8, In eastern Afghanistan insurgents trying to escape US Marines took refuge in a cave and killed 2 Americans during a 5-hour battle that left an estimated 23 rebels dead.
    (AP, 5/10/05)
2005        May 8, In Brazil top government officials from the 11 South American nations and 22 Middle Eastern and North African countries attending the Summit of South American-Arab Countries met ahead of the two-day summit's opening on May 10.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Central African Republic a coup leader who seized power in a rebel war two years ago sought the presidency in a runoff election against a man representing the former ruling party he ousted. The military strongman Francois Bozize faces former PM Martin Ziguele in a poll that many hope will bring an end to an era of army coups and revolts.
    (AP, 5/7/05)
2005        May 8, In Alexandria Egypt, some 3,000 female supporters of the opposition Muslim Brotherhood gathered to demand democratic reforms.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, The new Turkish Cypriot government of Premier Ferdi Sabit Soyer won a vote of confidence in the breakaway Turkish Cypriot state.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In India the number of rare bacterial meningitis cases in New Delhi rose by at least 30 over the last 24 hours with 15 confirmed deaths from the disease.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Indonesia US Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick signed an agreement to build a $245 million road along Aceh's western coast.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, Iraq's parliament approved six Cabinet nominees, handing four more posts to the disaffected Sunni Arab minority. Iraq's newly approved human rights minister turned down the job, saying he was selected only because he was a Sunni Arab.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Iraq gunmen shot and killed a senior official in Iraq's Transportation Ministry in Baghdad. Zoba Yass, director general of the ministry's projects, and his driver were killed.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Nepal seven mainstream opposition parties agreed to form a united front to push for a return to democracy following King Gyanendra's seizure of power. Nepal's Maoist rebels soon threw their support behind the decision.
    (AP, 5/11/05)
2005        May 8, In central Iraq 3 US soldiers were killed in separate attacks.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Iraq the Ansar al-Sunnah Army kidnapped Akihiko Saito (44), after ambushing a group of five foreign contractors. It later said Saito was "seriously injured" in the fighting and that the others had died.
    (AP, 5/10/05)
2005        May 8-2005 May 9, American troops backed by helicopters and war planes launched a major offensive against insurgents in a remote desert area near the Syrian border, and about 100 militants were killed in the first 24 hours.
    (AP, 5/9/05)(SFC, 5/10/05, p.A1)
2005        May 8, In southeastern Niger a swarm of locusts has descended on a town, sparking fears that the West African nation, where millions of people face food shortages, could endure another invasion of the crop-munching insects.
    (AP, 5/9/05)
2005        May 8, President Bush paid homage in the Netherlands to the "terrible price" paid by World War II soldiers who never came home from their fight against tyranny.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Pakistan's northwestern tribal region a bomb ripped through a car, killing 2 tribesmen.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Moscow Pres. Bush and Vladimir Putin went out of their way to take a unified stand on Middle East peace and terrorism after sharp words in recent days about democratic backsliding and postwar Soviet domination.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, Russia began a pomp-filled, high-security celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Allied victory over Nazi Germany.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Saudi Arabia a Pakistani man was beheaded for attempting to smuggle heroin into the kingdom.
    (AP, 5/8/05)
2005        May 8, In Syria a prominent Kurdish Islamic scholar was murdered in Damascus.
    (WSJ, 6/6/05, p.A1)

2006        May 8, The White House said it will nominate General Michael Hayden to run the CIA and defended the move to name a top military officer to run the civilian intelligence agency.
    (AFP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, US federal Judge Gary Klausner in Los Angeles sentenced "botmaster" Jeanson Ancheta (20) to 57 months in jail for taking control of an array of computers he had corralled into his "Botnet."
    (AFP, 5/9/06)
2006        May 8, Florida’s Gov. Jeb Bush declared a state of emergency and called in the state National Guard to help fight wildfires that have burned thousands of acres and blanketed highways with thick smoke.
    (AP, 5/9/06)
2006        May 8, Hawaii abandoned gas-price controls after 8 months.
    (WSJ, 5/9/06, p.A1)
2006        May 8, A former top aide to Ohio Republican Rep. Bob Ney pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate in the corruption and influence-peddling investigation involving lobbyist Jack Abramoff.
    (Reuters, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Stunt artist David Blaine emerged weak and wrinkly from a week spent submerged within an eight-foot snow globe-like tank in the plaza of New York's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, but without a world record for holding his breath.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2006        May 8, Silicon Graphics, a pioneer of 3-D visualization technology, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.
    (SFC, 5/9/06, p.C1)
2006        May 8, Thermo Electron said it will acquire Fisher Scientific for $10.6 billion.
    (SFC, 5/9/06, p.C2)
2006        May 8, In Afghanistan US airstrikes on a cave complex near Afghanistan's border with Pakistan killed four Taliban militants and destroyed a truck loaded with rockets.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Argentina requested the extradition of five former Uruguayan military officers and a former police officer wanted in the 1976 disappearance of Maria Claudia Garcia, the missing daughter-in-law of poet Juan Gelman.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, In China Bai Ningyang (19) walked into a Gongyi kindergarten in central Henan, locked the door and set fire to two gasoline cans. Local authorities said 13 children and one teacher were injured in addition to three students killed. Ningyang was captured the next day.
    (AP, 5/10/06)
2006        May 8, Oscar Arias (65), Nobel Peace Prize winner (1987), returned to the Costa Rican presidency, hoping to use his skills as a mediator to unite a country sharply divided over free trade with the United States.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Indian voters braved blistering summer heat as marathon state elections drew to a close with ruling Congress party chief Sonia Gandhi looking set to regain her parliamentary seat in a by-election. The death toll from a heat wave rose to 34.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Indonesia said it supported Iran's right to pursue nuclear technology for peaceful means ahead of a visit to the country by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad wrote to President Bush, proposing "new solutions" to their differences in the first letter from an Iranian head of state to an American president in 27 years.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2006        May 8, In Iraq a roadside bomb killed a US soldier. A car bomb went off near a main courthouse in western Baghdad, killing at least five people and wounding 10. In eastern Baghdad, a car bomb exploded during morning rush hour near a police patrol on Palestine street in eastern Baghdad, killing two policemen and wounding 12 Iraqis. Gunmen killed 4 police officers in Ramadi and 2 Iraqi soldiers in Tikrit. Violence across Iraq left at least 34 dead.
    (AP, 5/8/06)(Reuters, 5/8/06)(WSJ, 5/9/06, p.A1)(SFC, 5/10/06, p.A3)
2006        May 8, A report said UN peacekeepers, aid workers and teachers are having sex with Liberian girls as young as 8 in return for money, food or favors, threatening efforts to rebuild a nation wrecked by war.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, In the Hague the UN war crimes court sentenced Ivica Rajic, a Bosnian Croat former militia leader, to 12 years in prison. Rajic admitted that forces under his command operating in the Muslim village of Stupni Do in central Bosnia in October 1993 "forced Bosnian Muslim civilians out of their homes and hiding places, robbed them of their valuables, willfully killed Muslim men, women and children and sexually assaulted Muslim women".
    (AFP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, In Gaza rival gunmen from Hamas and Fatah fought with assault rifles and missiles, killing 3 militants in the bloodiest internal fighting since Hamas came to power six weeks ago.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Five lawmakers who took refuge in the Philippine legislature for two months while facing coup accusations walked out of the building in triumph after a court dismissed the charges.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Puerto Rico's governor and legislative leaders have agreed to abide by the recommendations of a commission seeking a solution to a fiscal crisis that has partially closed the island's government.
    (AP, 5/9/06)
2006        May 8, Rwandan President Paul Kagame said he was considering a plea for clemency from Pasteur Bizimungu, the nation's first post-genocide president (1994-2000). Bizimungu was in jail for crimes including inciting ethnic violence and embezzling state funds.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, A judge acquitted former Deputy President Jacob Zuma of rape in a politically charged trial that left in tatters his aspirations to lead South Africa.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
2006        May 8, Darfur refugees rioted and forced the UN humanitarian chief to rush from their camp, then later attacked African peacekeepers and killed a translator in a sign of deep tensions in Sudan’s war torn region despite a fragile peace deal. Arab militias, known as Janjaweed, attacked Labado town in South Darfur, killing and injuring up to 50 people. The AU has a base in Labado town.
    (AP, 5/8/06)(Reuters, 5/20/06)
2006        May 8, A senior American diplomat pledged US support to impoverished Tajikistan in improving security and expanding economic opportunities and political plurality.
    (AP, 5/8/06)
 2006        May 8, Thailand's Constitutional Court invalidated last month's parliamentary elections and ordered fresh polls in a bid to end a political impasse that has left the country unable to form a new government.
    (AP, 5/8/06)

2007        May 8, The US hired a Florida firm to build a Guantanamo camp by next May to house fleeing Cubans should there be an exodus when Castro dies.
    (WSJ, 5/9/07, p.A1)
2007        May 8, The Pentagon announced that it had notified more than 35,000 Army soldiers to be prepared to deploy to Iraq beginning in the fall.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2007        May 8, Governors and environmental officials from 31 US states announced that they would create a national registry to measure greenhouse gas emissions.
    (SFC, 5/9/07, p.A6)
2007        May 8, The SEC accused two Hong Kong residents of "widespread and unlawful trading activity" when they bought $15 million of Dow Jones & Co. stock ahead of an announcement that News Corp. was seeking to buy the company.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley signed the nation’s first statewide living-wage bill.
    (SFC, 5/9/07, p.A4)
2007        May 8, In Michigan Thomas Katona (56), the former Alcona County treasurer (1993-2006), pleaded guilty to embezzlement charges. He was accused of dumping public funds into fraudulent Nigerian investments. He lost more than $1.2 million in county funds altogether, plus $72,500 of his own money, despite a warning from his bank that he might be getting swindled.
    (AP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, It was reported that San Jose State Univ. planned to name its college of education after Connie Lurrie, the wife of former SF Giants owner Robert Lurrie, pledged to donate $10 million to the school.
    (SFC, 5/8/07, p.B2)
2007        May 8, Comcast Corp. Chief Executive Brian Roberts dazzled a cable industry audience, showing off for the first time in public new technology that enabled a data download speed of 150 megabits per second, roughly 25 times faster than today's standard cable modems. The technology, called DOCSIS 3.0, was developed by the cable industry's research arm, Cable Television Laboratories.
    (AP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, A new study found that US hospitals are charging uninsured patients about two-and-a-half times more than those with health insurance, a mark-up that has been steadily rising despite pressure to level prices.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, A flood surge moved down the Missouri River and tributaries following weekend storms and damages approached 1993 levels.
    (WSJ, 5/9/07, p.A1)
2007        May 8, Afghanistan's upper house of parliament passed a bill calling for a halt to all international military operations unless coordinated with the Afghan government, action seen as a rebuke of the international mission here. In southern Afghanistan suspected Taliban militants ambushed a NATO convoy, and a gunshot victim said soldiers fleeing the scene shot him and killed a man in a bakery. Airstrikes called in by US Special Forces soldiers fighting with insurgents killed at least 21 civilians in the Sangin area of Helmand province. One coalition soldier was also killed. The US military apologized and paid compensation to the families of 19 people killed and 50 wounded by US Marines Special Forces who fired indiscriminately on civilians after being hit by a suicide attack in eastern Afghanistan in March. Residents claimed that over 60 people were killed by the bombing.
    (AP, 5/8/07)(AP, 5/9/07)(SFC, 5/11/07, p.A20)
2007        May 8, Algeria’s El-Watan newspaper reported that authorities have arrested 5 people believed responsible for organizing deadly terrorist attacks last month.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, Amnesty Int’l. said in a report that China and Russia are supplying arms to Sudan that are being used to fuel the violence in the Darfur region in violation of a UN arms embargo. China and Russia quickly rejected the report and Sudan's government said it was "not justified." China confirmed it would send military engineers for a planned UN peacekeeping force to Sudan's Darfur region.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, It was reported that groups of elderly Australians are setting up backyard laboratories to manufacture an illegal euthanasia drug so they can kill themselves when they have had enough of life.
    (AFP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In Austria officials said Vienna's City Hall has launched a "sex hotline" to raise money for the capital's main public library. Callers paid 53 cents a minute to listen to an actress read breathless passages from erotica dating to the Victorian era.
    (AP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, News and information company Reuters Group PLC and financial data provider Thomson Corp. confirmed that they are discussing a combination of their businesses that values Reuters at more than $17 billion.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, A survey showed that London beat the glamour of Monaco, New York, Hong Kong and Tokyo to become the world's most expensive place to buy residential property.
    (AFP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, Cuba released Roberto de Jesus Guerra Perez, a journalist who served 22-months in prison for participating in an anti-government rally. Guerra has been a contributor to Miami's Payolibre and Nueva Prensa Cubana, as well as the US government-funded Radio Marti.
    (AP, 5/10/07)
2007        May 8, An Egyptian court decided in a rare ruling that President Hosni Mubarak's order to try 40 of the banned opposition Muslim Brotherhood's top figures before a military court was not valid.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, The leader of France's defeated Socialists appealed for calm after a second night of post-election violence left cars burned and store windows smashed.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In India Mohammed Shahabuddin, a popular Muslim lawmaker from the state of Bihar, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison on a charge of kidnapping with intent to kill a rival who disappeared eight years ago and has never been found.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, Iran accepted a compromise on the agenda of a 130-nation nuclear conference, meeting in Austria, clearing the way for the meeting to approve it and end six days of deadlock that threatened to doom the gathering to failure.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, A suicide car bomber flattened a restaurant in a busy market in the Shiite city of Kufa, killing at least 16 people, including women and children, and wounding 70. A roadside bomb went off next to a passing mini bus in the Shiite area of Zafaraniyah on the southeastern outskirts of Baghdad, killing three passengers and injuring five others. In Jalula a suicide bomber attacked a police station as the night-shift officers gathered in front of the building, preparing to go home. The explosion killed two policemen and wounded 20 others. The bullet-riddled bodies of six men, the apparent victims of sectarian violence, were found with their hands and legs bound and bearing marks of torture in an abandoned field in Baqouba. Also in Baqouba, 12 gunmen trying to rob a bank were confronted by Iraqi police, sparking a gunbattle that killed one police officer and wounded another. An Al-Qaida umbrella group threatened in a video to kill nine abducted Iraqi security officers in 72 hours unless their demands were met, including the release of all Sunni women from Iraqi prisons. An American soldier was killed and four others were wounded in a shooting attack in Diyala province. 2 children were among five people killed when a helicopter fired at militants operating an illegal checkpoint and planting a roadside bomb near Mandali.
    (AP, 5/8/07)(AP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, The Moroccan Association of Human Rights, formed in 1979) announced that it had chosen Khadija Ryadi (47) as its first woman president.
    (AFP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer and President Pervez Musharraf agreed to strengthen security along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border to contain the Taliban insurgency.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In southern Nigeria militants staged coordinated attacks on 3 pipelines in the wetlands region, the most damaging assault on the country's vital oil infrastructure in over a year. MEND claimed responsibility for the bombings, which forced Italian oil giant Eni to halt production of 150,000 barrels per day (bpd) feeding its Brass export terminal. Militants released 3 South Koreans and 8 Filipinos kidnapped last week at a Daewoo construction site in the oil-rich south.
    (Reuters, 5/8/07)(AFP, 5/8/07)(AP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, In Northern Ireland Protestant firebrand Ian Paisley and IRA veteran Martin McGuinness formed a long-unthinkable alliance as power-sharing went from dream to reality.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In the Philippines a homemade bomb ripped through a billiards hall in Tacurong city, killing three on the spot and five more overnight with 33 seriously wounded. Officials said the attack bore the hallmarks of Al-Qaeda-linked militants from Jemaah Islamiyah (JI).
    (AFP, 5/9/07)
2007        May 8, A newspaper owned by Saudi Arabia's royal family said one of seven recently exposed Saudi terrorist cells used Syria as a base for coordinating with al-Qaida in Iraq and held training camps in the desert of neighboring Yemen.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In Serbia an ally of late President Slobodan Milosevic was elected as the new parliament speaker, signaling a return of ultranationalists to power in the Balkan country.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In Taiwan rival lawmakers exchanged punches, climbed on each other's shoulders and jostled violently for position around the speaker's dais as the Legislature dissolved into chaos over an electoral reform bill.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, Thailand and the United States launched their annual war games.
    (AP, 5/8/07)
2007        May 8, In Zimbabwe riot police violently broke up a demonstration by dozens of lawyers protesting the arrest of two colleagues outside the High Court in Harare.
    (AP, 5/8/07)

2008        May 8, In Louisiana Carl Hunter (73), a construction company owner who lost two homes in Hurricane Katrina, claimed a $97 million Powerball prize, a jackpot won off a ticket he bought at a convenience store where he stopped to buy his wife a gallon of milk. Hunter took a lump sum payment that will give him $33.9 million after taxes.
    (AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, Federal officials arrested 13 fraternity members in San Diego, Ca., in a drug bust. Officials said 128 people, including at least 75 SDSU students, had been arrested as part of a 5-month investigation.
    (SFC, 5/9/08, p.B2)
2008        May 8, In Martinez, Ca., Contra Costa sex crimes prosecutor Michael Gresset (51) brought home a fellow female prosecutor (30) for afternoon sex. She later accused him of rape. That afternoon he convicted a man for molesting a 4-year-old relative. The case was not reported to police until Sep 26, 2008. A grand jury indictment against Gresset was issued in October 2009. In 2011 A judge dismissed the rape case saying prosecutors had failed to present exculpatory evidence to the grand jury. The woman, at the time of the indictment, had been in the process of securing a $450,000 civil claim settlement from the county over the alleged attack.
    (SFC, 7/27/09, p.A1)(SFC, 10/20/11, p.C6)
2008        May 8, In California the owners of Tejon Ranch agreed to place 178,000 acres under a series of conservation easements that will preserve the land as open space. 90% will be preserved for public recreation and the owner will be allowed to develop 10%. A land grant in 1843 established Rancho El Tejon.
    (SFC, 5/9/08, p.A1)
2008        May 8, Eddy Arnold, country singer, died, days short of his 90th birthday. His mellow baritone on songs like "Make the World Go Away" made him one of the most successful country singers in history.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, In southern Afghanistan US-led coalition killed several militants.
    (AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, President Evo Morales agreed to stand for election in a nationwide recall vote, gambling that Bolivians will re-elect him after just two years in office and shore up support for his pending reforms.
    (AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, A Chinese mountaineering team took the Olympic flame to the top of Mount Everest, a feat dreamed up to underscore China's ambitions for the Beijing games.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, Georgia's breakaway region of Abkhazia said it had shot down another Georgian spy drone.
    (Reuters, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, A rocket hit a downtown Baghdad park, killing two people as American and Iraqi forces battled Shiite militants believed responsible for many such attacks. A bomb went off on a minibus in Baghdad's eastern Zayona neighborhoods, killing two passengers and injuring five. 9 militants were killed in two American missile attacks in the New Baghdad neighborhood. US soldiers killed six Shiite extremists, who attacked US forces with shoulder fired rockets and small arms, in several clashes in Baghdad's Shiite militia stronghold of Sadr City.
    (AP, 5/8/08)(AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, Relief supplies from the United Nations began arriving in Myanmar, but US military planes loaded with aid were still denied access by the country's isolationist regime five days after a devastating cyclone. Some feared that lack of safe food and drinking water could push the death toll above 100,000.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, In Lebanon violence spread outside the capital. Sunnis and Shiites exchanged gunfire in the village of Saadnayel in the eastern Bekaa Valley. Hezbollah's leader Hassan Nasrallah said a government decision to declare the Shiite militant group's telecommunications network illegal amounted to a declaration of war. At least four people were killed and eight wounded Beirut.
    (AP, 5/8/08)(AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, A Malaysian Islamic court allowed a Chinese convert to renounce Islam in a rare decision for this conservative Muslim-led nation. Siti Fatimah, or Tan Ean Huang (38), said she had never practiced Islamic teachings since she converted in 1998 and only did so to enable her to marry Iranian Ferdoun Ashanian.
    (AFP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, Edgar Millan Gomez (42), Mexico's acting federal police chief, was shot dead outside his Mexico City apartment complex, as drug traffickers increasingly lashed back at a nationwide crackdown on organized crime. Bodyguards at the scene arrested Alejandro Ramirez (34). Edgar Guzman, the son of Sinaloa cartel chief Joaquin Guzman, was shot dead in Culiacan, Sinaloa state. Also killed in the attack was Arturo Meza Cazares, the son of Blanca Margarita Cazares, whom the US has identified as a key money launderer for the cartel. Police later said Millan’s murder was likely ordered by Arturo Beltran Leyva, a capo in the Sinaloa drug cartel.
    (AP, 5/9/08)(SFC, 5/9/08, p.A16)(http://drugpolicycentral.com/bot/xarticle/ajc8708.htm)(Econ, 5/17/08, p.45)
2008        May 8, In Nepal Ram Hari Shrestha, a Kathmandu businessman and supporter of the former rebels, died after he was abducted and beaten by Maoist cadre.
    (AFP, 5/21/08)(www.nepalhorizons.com/beta/news.php?newsid=2851)
2008        May 8, A US diplomatic cable, unveiled by WikiLeaks in 2010, described Nicaragua’s Pres. Ortega as a "willing follower" of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. The report said Ortega uses Venezuelan oil money to fund Sandinista campaigns and that "several unconfirmed reports indicate that Ortega will have as much as 500 million dollars at his disposal over the course of 2008.
    (AP, 12/8/10)
2008        May 8, North Korea handed over thousands of pages of nuclear weapons documents to a US diplomat, that will help verify the North’s plutonium holdings.
    (WSJ, 5/9/08, p.A1)
2008        May 8, Vladimir Putin was named prime minister of Russia after a fervent speech full of ambitious plans that overshadowed his low-key successor and suggested that he will keep a strong hand in ruling the country.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, In Somalia two police officers and five insurgents died in the attack when Islamist fighters fired rocket-propelled grenades and heavy submachine guns at the heavily guarded K4 district of Mogadishu. Three other insurgents were captured. Islamist spokesman Abdirahim Issa Adow said fighters killed eight police and one Islamist fighter died and two were wounded.
    (AP, 5/9/08)
2008        May 8, Spain formally laid claim to a shipwreck that yielded a $500 million treasure, saying it has proof the vessel was Spanish. Officials said the shipwreck at the heart of the dispute is the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, a Spanish warship sunk by the British navy southwest of Portugal in 1804 with more than 200 people on board.
    (AP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, Sri Lanka’s defense ministry said at least 74 Tamil Tiger rebels and three Sri Lankan soldiers have been killed in 3 days of fighting in the island's north.
    (AFP, 5/8/08)
2008        May 8, UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities entered into force.
    (www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=17)
2008        May 8, In Zimbabwe farmers' groups said the ruling ZANU-PF has pushed 40,000 workers off farms in a post-election campaign targeting supporters of the opposition ahead of a possible presidential run-off. Pressure mounted to admit foreign observers to oversee a presidential election run-off amid fresh claims pro-government militias were instilling terror in the countryside.
    (Reuters, 5/8/08)(AFP, 5/8/08)

2009        May 8, A federal jury acquitted W.R. Grace and 3 of its executives on all criminal charges that they knowingly contaminated Libby, Montana, with asbestos and conspired to cover up the deed.
    (SFC, 5/9/09, p.A6)
2009        May 8, In California the 4-day Jesusita fire in Santa Barbara was only 10% contained as of the evening, after charring more than 13 square miles and destroying about 31 homes with another 47 damaged. By the next day the fire was 40% contained and residents were allowed to return to the area.
    (AP, 5/9/09)(SSFC, 5/10/09, p.A12)
2009        May 8, In Panama City, Florida, Dr. Jason Newsom resigned from the Bay County Health Department under pressure following his launch of a one-man war on obesity by posting sardonic warnings on an electronic sign outside. After the lawyers threatened to sue, his bosses made him remove the anti-fried doughnut rants and eventually forced him to resign.
    (AP, 8/13/09)
2009        May 8, In the Midwest a wave of storms damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses in Kansas, Kentucky, Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri. 5 people were left dead.
    (AP, 5/9/09)
2009        May 8, Brazilians huddled in cow pens converted into emergency shelters, as swollen rivers continue to rise and northern Brazil's worst floods in decades boosted the number of homeless to nearly 300,000. The death toll rose to 39, and coffins started popping out of the soaked earth.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In London Marks & Spencer admitted it had "boobed" in a row over larger bras, agreeing to slash the prices of its DD-plus cup sizes to bring them in line with smaller models.
    (AFP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In Canada a provincial medical official said a woman from Alberta has died from the H1N1 flu virus, making her the first Canadian to die from the virus.
    (Reuters, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, Chad’s government claimed that 225 rebels and 22 soldiers had been killed in clashes over the last 2 days south of the main eastern city of Abeche.
    (AFP, 5/9/09)
2009        May 8, In Colombia Jorge Noguera, former director of the civilian intelligence service, DAS, was charged with conspiracy and murder. He was accused of colluding with paramilitaries and helping to plan the murders of opposition figures.
    (Econ, 5/16/09, p.43)
2009        May 8, A Croatian court convicted an opposition lawmaker of war crimes, making him the country's first senior politician to be held responsible for wartime atrocities against Serbs. Branimir Glavas was sentenced to 10 years in prison for war crimes against civilians, but he remained free because he enjoys parliamentary immunity from detention. During the 1991 Serbo-Croat war, he was a member of the ruling Croatian Democratic Union and formed a paramilitary unit in eastern Croatian town of Osijek, where he was seen as a warlord.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In Ecuador an angry mob dragged two suspected robbers from a police station in Valencia and burned them to death.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, Indian police used teargas and batons to disperse hundreds of rock-throwing Kashmiris protesting against the holding of national elections in the revolt-hit region.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In Ireland Dr. Yuri Melini (47), a leading Guatemalan environmentalist who recently survived an assassination attempt, won a human rights award for his efforts to stop the rapid growth of mines in his mineral-rich nation. Melini received the annual Front Line Award for Human Rights Defenders at Risk in a Dublin City Hall ceremony.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In southern Lebanon authorities arrested five people for allegedly spying for Israel as part of the two countries' long-running espionage battle.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, Malaysia said it will free 13 people detained under internal security laws, including three ethnic Indian activists, members of the banned ethnic Indian rights group Hindraf, held without trial since organizing anti-government protests in 2007.
    (AFP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, Mexico’s federal attorney general's office said authorities have arrested 25 Tijuana police officers and two civilians on organized crime charges for alleged drug gang ties. In the border state of Chihuahua, prosecutors said police acting on an anonymous tip found two clandestine graves with 7 bodies in the town of Palomas, across from Columbus, New Mexico.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In Nigeria the governor of southern oil-rich Rivers state signed a law making life jail terms mandatory for kidnappers in the area.
    (AFP, 5/9/09)
2009        May 8, Pakistani jets screamed over Mingora, a Taliban-controlled town, and bombed suspected militant positions as hundreds of thousands fled in terror and other trapped residents appealed for a pause in the fighting so they could escape. Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said that 140 militants had been killed in the last 24 hours, adding to around 150 already reported slain. He did give any figures for civilian deaths, but witness and local media say that noncombatants have been killed.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, In the northern Philippines Typhoon Cha-hom dumped heavy rains overnight, triggered landslides and left at least 10 people dead and four missing.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, South Sudanese gunmen killed dozens of people from a rival tribe, most of them women and children, in one of a string of attacks that have raised fears for elections in the region. Fighters from the Lou Nuer tribe raided the village of Torkej, home to the Nuer Jikany, in the region's Upper Nile state, in apparent revenge for cattle thefts. Some 71 people were killed in Torkej.
    (Reuters, 5/11/09)(Econ, 6/13/09, p.49)
2009        May 8, Pope Benedict XVI arrived in Jordan and expressed deep respect for Islam. He said he hopes the Catholic Church can play a role in Mideast peace as he began his first trip to the region, where he hopes to improve frayed ties with Muslims.
    (AP, 5/8/09)
2009        May 8, Venezuelan police uncovered a cache of weapons and explosives at a Caracas apartment. The discovery led to the detention of 3 citizens of the Dominican Republic, Luini Omar Campusano de la Cruz (38); Edgar Floiran Sanchez (29); and Diomedis Campusano Perez (31) and a Frenchman, Laurent Frederic Bocquet, on suspicion of planning terrorist acts.
    (AP, 5/9/09)
2009        May 8, Venezuela’s National Guard began occupying dozens of oil rigs, docks and boats operated by private contractors, both local and foreign, hired by PDVSA, the state oil company. It appeared that PDVSA had run out of cash.
    (Econ, 5/16/09, p.44)

2010        May 8, In Utah GOP delegates voted to bar Sen. Bob Bennett (76) from seeking a fourth term, making him the first congressional incumbent to be ousted this year and demonstrates the challenges candidates face from the right in 2010.
    (AP, 5/9/10)
2010        May 8, BP’s first attempt to divert a major crude spill was foiled and it could be at least a day before another attempt at putting a lid on the well could be made. Meanwhile, thick blobs of tar washed up on Alabama's white sand beaches, yet another sign the spill was worsening.
    (AP, 5/9/10)
2010        May 8, In eastern Afghanistan private security guards opened fire and killed a 30-year-old civilian after the guards' vehicle hit a roadside bomb in Wardak province.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Hundreds of flights between Europe and North America were either delayed or canceled due to the spreading cloud of volcanic ash stretching across much of the northern Atlantic. Spain shut 19 northern airports including Barcelona because of the cloud of ash.
    (AP, 5/8/10)(Reuters, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In southeastern China Zhou Yezhong (36) stabbed to death 8 people including his wife, elderly mother and young daughter in Chengyuan village in Jiangxi province. Another two people were killed and three wounded in a stabbing spree by a man (42) in Hong Kong.
    (AFP, 5/9/10)
2010        May 8, Costa Rica inaugurated Laura Chinchilla as its first woman leader, replacing Nobel laureate Oscar Arias with his former vice president and protege.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, It was reported that Egyptian billionaire Mohamed Al Fayed has sold luxury London department store Harrods to Qatar Holding, the Gulf royal family's investment arm.
    (AFP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that Europe will set up an intervention mechanism to calm markets rattled by the Greek debt crisis.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Bishop Walter Mixa, a leading German bishop who has acknowledged slapping children and is being investigated for sexual abuse of minors and financial misconduct, lost his job as Pope Benedict XVI continued cleaning house.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In Hungary Andor Lilienthal (99), the last surviving member of 27 original grandmaster chess players, died in Budapest.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In northern India at least 52 people were killed and scores injured by heavy rains over the past two days. The worst hit areas were the central and eastern regions of Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, where 35 people died and some 50 were injured. The other 17 casualties were reported from neighboring Bihar state. Maoist rebels in central India blew up an army truck killing 8 paramilitary soldiers and wounding 2 others in a densely forested area in Bijapur district of Chattisgarh state.
    (AFP, 5/8/10)(AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Iran voiced optimism about Turkish and Brazilian mediation efforts in its nuclear dispute with the West, welcoming in principle ideas aimed at reviving a stalled fuel deal with major powers.
    (Reuters, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In northern Iraq bombs planted inside the home of a policeman exploded, killing him, his mother and one other resident. The bombing was one of several attacks around Iraq's north that killed a total of nine people since the previous evening. The kidnapped teenage son of a wealthy Sufi sheik was found dead. Mohammed Tahir Said (16) was kidnapped on April 27 and a $250,000 ransom was demanded. Hundreds of students and other activists rallied to protest the kidnap and murder of Sardasht Othman, a Kurdish journalist in northern Iraq, with many blaming the regional government for his death. 
    (AP, 5/8/10)(AP, 5/9/10)
2010        May 8, Opponents of Lithuania's first gay pride parade threw smoke bombs and tried to break through a barrier but were stopped by police firing tear gas.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In Mexico Mario Villanueva, former governor of the Caribbean state of Quintana Roo (1993-1999), was turned over to US authorities at the international airport in Toluca. He faced charges of helping a cartel smuggling cocaine through the resort of Cancun en route to the US market. Villanueva spent two years in hiding before he was arrested in Cancun in 2001.  3 headless bodies were found just outside of Acapulco. The bodies of 5 other men were found with multiple gunshot wounds in a car north of Acapulco.
    (AP, 5/9/10)(SSFC, 5/9/10, p.A5)
2010        May 8, In Mexico Joaquin Capilla (b.1928), the country’s top Olympic-medal recipient, died. Capilla brought home medals in 1948, 1952 and 1956.
    (AP, 5/9/10)(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joaqu%C3%ADn_Capilla)
2010        May 8, In northern Mexico the body of Ronald C. Ryan (67), a US citizen from Phoenix, Az., was found the partially buried near a creek on the outskirts of Santa Ana, Sonora state. He had been reported missing May 3. State police had reported detaining three men the following day who had left Ryan's pickup truck at a carwash in Santa Ana.
    (AP, 5/10/10)
2010        May 8, In Nepal markets reopened for business, vehicles returned to the streets and some banks allowed customers to withdraw cash after the former communist rebels ended their debilitating general strike after six days. The top leaders of the Maoist party decided late the previous evening to end the strike since it was making life difficult.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Pakistan successfully test-fired two ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads, as the Islamic nation's leader urged the world to recognize it as a legitimate nuclear power.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Palestinian leaders gave their backing for indirect peace talks with Israel, clearing the way for the Obama administration's first sustained on-the-ground Mideast peace effort. Mideast envoy George Mitchell will now shuttle between the Israeli and Palestinian leaders for up to four months to try to narrow the vast gaps on the terms of Palestinian statehood. Four Palestinians were injured and four others went missing when a smuggling tunnel on the border between the Gaza Strip and Egypt collapsed.
    (AP, 5/8/10)(AFP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev turned over scores of volumes from an investigation into the Katyn massacre to his Polish counterpart, a move underlining Moscow's new willingness to repair long-troubled relations with Warsaw.
    (AP, 5/8/10)
2010        May 8, In western Siberia 2 explosions tore through the Raspadskaya mine just before midnight, killing at least 66 workers and injuring 41 others. A further 24 people remained trapped in the mine, Russia's largest underground coal mine, including rescue workers.
    (AP, 5/9/10)(AP, 5/10/10)(AP, 5/11/10)(AP, 5/12/10)(AP, 5/13/10)
2010        May 8, Somali pirates off East Africa, armed with rocket-propelled grenades and automatic guns, hijacked the Marida Marguerite, a chemical tanker, with 22 crew members on board. The ship was reported released on Dec 28.
    (AP, 5/8/10)(AP, 12/28/10)
2010        May 8, Thailand's government and "Red Shirt" protesters committed themselves to a faltering peace process despite twin attacks that left two police officers dead.
    (AFP, 5/8/10)

2011        May 8, In Afghanistan gunfire rang out through Kandahar after government troops fought running battles with Taliban fighters, the second day of fighting since scores of insurgents launched waves of attacks on key government and police targets. The fighting left 23 attackers killed as well as two members of the security forces. Nearly all the insurgents killed so far had escaped late last month from Kandahar city's main Sarposa prison. NATO said it had seized more than six tons of hashish during an operations against insurgents in Kandahar province's Panjwai and Zhari district.
    (Reuters, 5/8/11)(AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, Bahrain's state news said the Sunni king has ordered a state of emergency to be lifted from June 1, after imposing it in mid-March following weeks of Shi'ite-led street protests in the Gulf Arab kingdom. Opposition leaders appeared in a military court charged as part of a group of 21 with forming a terrorist organization and attempting to overthrow the monarchy.
    (Reuters, 5/8/11)(AFP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, Cuban dissident Juan Wilfredo Soto (46) died in Santa Clara. He was detained May 5 during an anti-government protest. Government opponents accused police of beating him and provoking his death. A medical examiner and relatives of a late Cuban dissident later concluded that Soto died of natural causes and showed no signs of being beaten.
    (AP, 5/8/11)(AP, 5/12/11)
2011        May 8, In Dagestan a Russian officer and three rebels were killed when police discovered an encampment in the woods near Chechnya. Police reported that an insurgent was killed and two others detained in an operation in the city of Astrakhan in the Volga delta.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, Egypt's army said that 190 people would be tried in military courts over sectarian violence a day earlier that left 13 people dead.
    (Reuters, 5/8/11)(SFC, 5/10/11, p.A2)
2011        May 8, Haitian lawmakers amended an article in the old constitution to do away with a law banning dual nationality. It would become official after it is published in The Monitor, a government publication.
    (AP, 5/9/11)
2011        May 8, Iran's Bushehr nuclear power station began operating at a low level in a crucial step toward bringing it online.
    (Reuters, 5/10/11)
2011        May 8, In Iraq Abu Huthaifa al-Battawi, the man accused of masterminding an attack on a Baghdad church last year, wrestled a gun from a guard at a detention facility, freed his comrades and launched an hours-long assault that ended with 17 people dead, including a top counterterrorism officer. A group of the detainees, including al-Battawi, managed to seize a car and were driving toward the gate of the compound when a guard opened killed them with a machine gun.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In Kenya four children were killed and one seriously injured after playing with unexploded ordnance they found near a military training ground near the village of Ole Maroroi.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In Libya intense fighting erupted near Misrata as smoke billowed from fuel depots bombed by regime forces laying siege to the lifeline port city where rebels awaited arms from Italy.
    (AFP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In Mexico an anti-violence march that began in a central state with a few hundred people and gathered thousands over a four-day trek reached Mexico City, led by a poet whose son was killed by suspected drug traffickers. One marine and 12 suspected gunmen of the Zetas drug cartel were killed in a gun battle on Falcon Lake in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas. The decapitated bodies of 11 men were found in two places in Durango, bringing the rapidly mounting toll to 179.
    (AP, 5/8/11)(AP, 5/10/11)
2011        May 8, In Morocco thousands of protesters marched to demand reform in the Arab world's longest-serving dynasty and to oppose militant violence after a deadly bomb attack.
    (Reuters, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In Mozambique Vale, the Brazilian mining giant, opened a new $1.7 billion coal mine, tapping the southern African country's thermal and coking coal reserves of around 23 billion tons.
    (AFP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, Nigeria's opposition Congress for Progressive Change party asked a court to nullify the election of Pres. Goodluck Jonathan because of alleged irregularities in some areas.
    (AFP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In the Philippines a police intelligence unit arrested Asdatul Sahirun, a suspected member of the Abu Sayyaf extremist movement, at a shopping mall in the Manila’s Malate tourist district.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In the Philippines tropical storm Aere slammed into the eastern coast, bringing heavy rains and landslides. At least 22 people were left dead and thousands forced to leave their homes.
    (AFP, 5/8/11)(AP, 5/10/11)
2011        May 8, North and south Sudan agreed to start withdrawing unauthorized troops from the flashpoint Abyei border region, a week after clashes there left 14 people dead. The pullout would begin May 10 and be completed within a week.
    (AFP, 5/9/11)
2011        May 8, In Southern Sudan rebels attacked cattle herders. 38 militia were killed in the village of Nadiet. SPLA spokesman Philip Aguer said 34 of those killed were civilians.
    (AP, 5/10/11)(AP, 5/12/11)
2011        May 8, In Syria a 12-year-old boy was killed as gunfire and shelling erupted in the central city of Homs. An activist said the two-day death toll in Banias had risen to six. State-run SANA said authorities have seized sophisticated weapons and that the army is still hunting down "armed terrorist groups" across the country, including in Banias.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, In Togo seven boats capsized in a storm on lake Togo, leaving at least 36 people dead.
    (AFP, 5/9/11)
2011        May 8, In Venezuela the director of a municipal police force and his son were slain in the western part of the country. Investigators believed the criminals began shooting during an attempt to steal the officer's vehicle.
    (AP, 5/8/11)
2011        May 8, Yemeni security forces backed by army units opened fire on protesters demanding the ouster of the longtime President Ali Abdullah Saleh. One protester was killed in the western port of Hodeida, and two were killed in the southern city of Taiz.
    (AP, 5/8/11)

2012        May 8, The US Treasury announced sanctions against Ivan Archivaldo Guzman Salazar and Ovidio Guzman Lopez, 2 sons of Sinaloa cartel drug lord Joaquin Guzman.
    (SFC, 5/9/12, p.A2)
2012        May 8, A federal judge said Oracle cannot seek $1 billion in damages from Google for infringing on copyrights when it developed Android software, because a jury could not agree on whether it was fair use.
    (SFC, 5/9/12, p.D2)
2012        May 8, Maurice Sendak (83), renowned children's author, died in Connecticut. His books captivated generations of kids and simultaneously scared their parents. Sendak wrote and illustrated more than 50 children's books, including "Where the Wild Things Are," his most famous, published in 1963. Sendak left instructions that his home in Ridgefield become a museum for his more than 10,000 illustrations.
    (www.nytimes.com/2012/05/09/books/maurice-sendak-childrens-author-dies-at-83.html)(SFC, 9/15/14, p.A6)
2012        May 8, Florida authorities said 10 alleged members of a white supremacist group training near Orlando and Disney World for a "race war" have been rounded up in a series of arrests. Ringleader Marcus Faella (39) had been planning and preparing his American Front (AF) for what he believed to be an inevitable race war.
    (Reuters, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, North Carolinians voted to change the state constitution to say that the only valid "domestic legal partnership" in the state is marriage between a man and a woman. The amendment passed 61 to 39 percent, making North Carolina the 29th state with a gay marriage ban in its constitution.
    (http://tinyurl.com/d8r8f2t)
2012        May 8, In Afghanistan Taliban insurgents ambushed a convoy of education officials in Paktika province. 5 officials were killed and 3 others wounded.
    (SFC, 5/9/12, p.A2)
2012        May 8, Australia's government said it will rein in defense spending and scale back promised increases in foreign aid as it tries to become the first major developed economy to balance its books after the global economic crisis.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Andrew Moss, the chief executive of Britain's second-biggest insurance group Aviva, stepped down becoming the latest victim of a growing shareholder revolt over pay for top managers.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Ecuador’s legislature passed legislation that would require banks to forgive any outstanding debt on mortgages for first-time home buyers of properties worth up to $146,000 if they default and forfeit a home.
    (SFC, 5/10/12, p.A2)
2012        May 8, An Egyptian court upheld a one-year prison sentence for prominent activist Asmaa Mahfouz for assaulting a witness in an ongoing trial over a deadly clash between soldiers and Christians. She was in the United States and unable to attend the sentencing.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, At least 100 pilots from India's debt-laden national carrier Air India failed to turn up to work in a move the civil aviation minister described as an "illegal" strike. The pilots were protesting against former Indian Airlines flyers -- who moved to Air India when the two firms merged -- also being trained for new Boeing 787 Dreamliner airplanes, claiming that would threaten their own career prospects.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, The Indonesia Embassy in Singapore said it is pushing for a ban on cleaning outside windows. 8 Indonesian maids in Singapore have fallen to their deaths from high-rise apartments this year.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, In Iran Seo Ok-Seok, a UN nuclear inspector from South Korea, was killed and a colleague was injured in a car crash near a reactor site in Khondab.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Interpol said it has put Iraq's fugitive Sunni vice president on its most-wanted list after issuing a so-called "red notice" for Tariq al-Hashemi, who is currently in Turkey. The Lyon, France-based organization said on its website the move came at the request of the government in Baghdad.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu called off plans to hold early parliamentary elections and unveiled a revamped coalition government, forming a broad alliance with Kadima, the chief opposition party, that could free his hand to take action on peace with the Palestinians and decide whether to attack Iran.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Former Libyan rebels angry over unpaid stipends opened fire on the headquarters of the interim government after surrounding the building in Tripoli. Militias armed with machine guns and mortars tried to storm the prime minister's office. A gunbattle with security forces left one guard dead.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)(AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi received her first passport in 24 years ahead of a planned trip to Norway and Britain.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, A North Korean boat hijacked three boats with 29 Chinese fishermen on board and demanded 1.2 million yuan ($190,000) for their release. The fisherman were freed May 20 after being held for 13 days.
    (AP, 5/17/12)(AFP, 5/21/12)
2012        May 8, Qatar-based Al-Jazeera said it has shut its English-language bureau in China after its correspondent became the first foreign journalist to be expelled from the country since 1998. Beijing's refusal to renew the visa of US citizen Melissa Chan sparked anger among press groups, which linked the decision to a documentary by the international news channel on forced prison labor in China.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, In Russia Dmitry Medvedev was confirmed as prime minister. Police broke up a demonstration by hundreds of opposition activists who had spent the night outside the presidential administration offices to protest Vladimir Putin's return as president.
    (AP, 5/8/12)(SFC, 5/9/12, p.A4)
2012        May 8, A South African judge ordered prosecutors to investigate whether Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe's government committed human rights abuses against his rivals ahead of 2008 elections.
    (AP, 5/8/12)
2012        May 8, Rebels in Sudan's Darfur region said they had seized control of Girayda (Gereida) town from government troops, the latest in a reported upsurge of fighting in a region that has seen nearly a decade of unrest.
    (AFP, 5/8/12)

2013        May 8, US officials said the Obama administration is providing $100 million in new Syria aid, but the money is for humanitarian purposes only and not linked to any decision on arming Syrian rebels.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, In Arizona a jury found Jodi Arias (32) guilty of first-degree murder in the 2008 killing of her onetime boyfriend, Travis Alexander.
    (SFC, 5/9/13, p.A8)
2013        May 8, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bill to schedule the state’s first gray wolf hunting season.
    (SFC, 5/9/13, p.A6)
2013        May 8, In Tennessee Sister Megan Rice (83) and fellow protesters Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed were convicted of interfering with national security when they broke into a nuclear weapons facility in Oak Ridge. On May 15, 2015, an appeals court ordered all three to be released.
    (SFC, 5/9/13, p.A6)(SFC, 5/16/15, p.A5)
2013        May 8, Afghan police opened fire on hundreds of demonstrators. 8 protesters were killed. They were protesting raids that Afghan and NATO forces conducted in their village of Loye Karez two days earlier. 3 people were killed when their vehicle triggered an explosive device in Lashkar Gah, Helmand province. Afghan intelligence service said it arrested an Afghan national who confessed to having been sent by the Taliban to carry out a suicide bombing against Abdullah Abdullah, a presidential candidate in the 2009 election.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Two Australian citizens from New South Wales state fell from the mid deck of the Carnival Spirit. They were discovered missing the next morning after the ship docked at Sydney's Circular Quay.
    (AP, 5/9/13)
2013        May 8, In Bangladesh a fire fed by huge piles of acrylic products used to make sweaters killed 8 people at the Tung Hai Sweater factory. The dead included a ruling-party politician and a top official in the country's powerful clothing manufacturers' trade group.
    (AP, 5/9/13)
2013        May 8, Belgian, French and Swiss authorities arrested at least 31 people in a sweep for robbers who pulled off a diamond theft on Feb 18 with clockwork precision at Brussels Airport.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, The British government announced a modest, austerity-sensitive program of legislation intended to tighten immigration controls, reform pensions and reduce red tape for business as Queen Elizabeth II laid out plans for the next year at the state opening of Parliament.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Geza Vermes, British scholar, Jew and ex-Catholic priest, died. His life’s work was a definitive study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, discovered in 1947. His books included “Jesus the Jew" (1973).
    (Econ, 5/18/13, p.98)
2013        May 8, In CongoDRC a community leader said that nearly 30 people have been kidnapped by the M23 rebels in their eastern fief of Rutshuru since the beginning of April. The kidnappings appear to be for ransom.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Guinea's leading human rights group confirmed that a member of the country's paramilitary police unit was found guilty of raping a female demonstrator inside the national soccer stadium during the Sep 28, 2009, pro-democracy rally.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, In northern India a bus fell into a river in Himachal Pradesh state killing at least 39 people.
    (SFC, 5/9/13, p.A2)(www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-22457396)
2013        May 8, Iran withdrew its ambassador in Cyprus to protest the country's decision to extradite an Iranian to the United States for prosecution. Iranian Saeid Mohabat (45) was extradicted to the US last month to face charges of breaching UN sanctions against Iran.
    (AP, 5/10/13)
2013        May 8, In Iraq at least 8 people were killed and nearly 40 were wounded in separate attacks in Fallujah, Kirkuk, Mosul and Baghdad.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Israel gave preliminary approval to build nearly 300 housing units in a West Bank settlement, bringing a Palestinian rebuke and possibly complicating US efforts to relaunch Mideast peace talks.
    (AP, 5/9/13)
2013        May 8, In Italy former Premier Silvio Berlusconi's tax fraud conviction and four-year prison sentence were upheld on the first appeal.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Mexico's government proposed a sweeping overhaul of the banking sector to make credit cheaper and more available, a move desperately needed in a country where bank loans represent less than 20 percent of GDP — one-tenth the level seen in the United States.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Pakistani PM Mir Hazar Khan Khoso's office said a ban on air conditioners in government offices will go into effect on May 15 and will continue until pervasive energy shortages improve.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, In Russia Vladislav Surkov, a longtime Kremlin strategist considered the architect of the tightly controlled political system created under President Vladimir Putin, resigned his post of deputy prime minister. His ouster followed an unusually public feud with investigators over a criminal investigation into Skolkovo, a government project to promote innovation modeled on Silicon Valley. Surkov was overseeing the ambitious project.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, South Sudan's military spokesman says a rebel force under David Yau Yau has overrun part of Boma, a town in the country's east near the border with Ethiopia.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Syrian troops pushed into Khirbet Ghazaleh, a strategic town along the highway leading to the Jordanian border. A massive Internet outage engulfed most of the country for a second day.
    (AP, 5/8/13)
2013        May 8, Uruguay convicted Gen. Miguel Dalmao for dictatorship-era human rights violations. He was sentenced to 28 years in prison for the death of a communist professor.
    (AP, 5/9/13)
2013        May 8, In Yemen suspected militants shot and killed three senior air force pilots in Dubba, an area about 10 km (six miles) outside Al-Annad base in the southern province of Lahj.
    (AP, 5/8/13)

2014        May 8, Pablo Picasso’s 1932 oil painting “The Rescue" sold for $31.5 million at a Sotheby auction in NYC.
    (SFC, 5/9/14, p.A8)
2014        May 8, British police officers across London will wear video cameras when responding to emergency calls as part of a year-long pilot project launched today.
    (AFP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Religious leaders in Britain called for all meat to be labelled with details of how it was slaughtered after it emerged halal and kosher meat in supermarkets is often not marked as such.
    (AFP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Colin Pillinger (70), an ebullient British space scientist died. He captured the popular imagination with his failed 2003 attempt to land a British probe on Mars.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Bulgarian prosecutors charged Maria Divizieva, the prime minister's chief of staff, with aiding in the embezzlement of EU funds, two weeks after charges were pressed against two top magistrates in the same case.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In Chile tens of thousands of students protested for education reform in their first march since Pres. Bachelet took power.
    (SFC, 5/9/14, p.A2)
2014        May 8, China accused Vietnam of intentionally colliding with its ships in the South China Sea, but called for talks to end a bitter row sparked by Beijing's parking of a giant oil rig in contested waters.
    (Reuters, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Chinese police shot dead an assailant who attacked a police vehicle with knives in the far western region of Xinjiang.
    (Reuters, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, France said it will deploy 3,000 soldiers to combat Islamist violence in the vast and largely lawless Sahel region to pursue counter-terrorism in north Mali, the north of Niger and in Chad.
    (AFP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In Ghana at least 4 people were killed when a helicopter crashed while heading to an offshore oil field operated by Lukoil. Three survivors were rescued and one person remained missing.
    (AP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, Honduras for the first time extradited a suspected drug trafficker to the United States. Carlos Arnoldo Lobo (40) was arrested March 27 and has been indicted on US drug trafficking charges in Florida.
    (AP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, In Hong Kong a blockbuster corruption trial involving property tycoons Thomas and Raymond Kwok got under way. They were among five defendants pleading not guilty to bribery charges.
    (AFP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, India rejected the findings of a World Health Organization (WHO) study that ranks New Delhi as the world's worst city for air pollution.
    (Reuters, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Indian scientists reported the discovery of 14 new species of so-called dancing frogs in the jungle mountains of southern India — just in time, they fear, to watch them fade away.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In Italy Claudio Scajola, a former minister in several of Silvio Berlusconi's center-right governments, was arrested in a luxury Rome hotel for allegedly helping Amedeo Matacena, a prominent businessman convicted of Mafia association, flee to Dubai last summer.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In Italy seven managers and ex-members of parliament were arrested over alleged attempts to influence public tenders for Milan's Expo 2015, casting a shadow over plans to stage an international showcase event and help kick-start the economy.
    (Reuters, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, Lebanon recorded its first case of the often-fatal Middle East respiratory virus (MERS). The patient had recently returned from a visit to several Gulf countries, including Saudi Arabia.
    (AP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, In Libya 3 policemen were killed instantly when the thieves opened fire on officers who chased them during the theft of a car in Tripoli. Two more policemen died later of their wounds. The armed group took one policeman captive.
    (AP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, In Pakistan a roadside bomb killed 9 paramilitary soldiers near Miran Shah in North Waziristan.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In southwestern Spain 5 members of a youth football team aged between 12 and 15 were killed when their bus collided with another vehicle. Police arrested the driver of the second vehicle, a farm digger, after he tested positive for drugs.
    (AP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, Syrian rebels detonated a huge bomb underneath an Aleppo hotel used by President Bashar al-Assad's forces, destroying it The rebel Islamic Front claimed responsibility said 50 soldiers were killed in the Carlton Hotel blast.
    (Reuters, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Thailand's anti-graft agency indicted former PM Yingluck Shinawatra for negligence, a ruling that came a day after a court threw her out of office and could kill off any hopes she has of staging an electoral comeback.
    (Reuters, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, Tunisia’s President Moncef Marzouk declared a state of emergency in Douz, a southern desert town swept by days of clashes between rival tribes. An overnight curfew would remain in force until May 22 because of the violence.
    (AFP, 5/9/14)
2014        May 8, In eastern Ukraine the pro-Russia insurgency decided to go ahead with a May 11 referendum on autonomy or even independence despite a call from Russian President Vladimir Putin to postpone it.
    (AP, 5/8/14)
2014        May 8, In Venezuela hundreds of National Guard members and police broke up four camps maintained by student protesters and arrested 243 people in an early morning raid. Officials reported one officer killed in clashes following the raids.
    (AP, 5/8/14)(SFC, 5/9/14, p.A4)
2014        May 8, Yemeni armed forces swept al-Qaida fighters out of a district in the country's south, one of the main goals of the major offensive waged by the military the past two weeks. Yemen’s US embassy was closed to the public after a spate of attacks against foreigners and fears that Al-Qaeda will seek revenge for a deadly offensive in the south.
    (AP, 5/8/14)(AFP, 5/8/14)

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